Sustainable & Circular Electronics Agenda

Green & Sustainable Electronics

Day1: November 18, 2020

Keynote presentations - Eco-principles in consumer electronics: redesign, repurpose or refurbish
9:00 am - 12:15 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Circular economy research implications for EU Ecodesign Policy influencing the recyclability of electronic products
Ceri Fenwick
EngD Researcher, Centre for Environment & Sustainability/Environmental Research Engineer
University of Surrey/Sony Interactive Entertainment Europe
Ceri's presentation will focus on the challenges faced to ensure that regulations implemented under the EU’s Circular Economy Action Plan deliver on their environmental aims. For the electronics sector, product-specific regulations are being applied through the Ecodesign Directive to mandate material efficiency legislation that is appropriate and effective. This includes Design for Recycling options that target priority materials such as plastics and CRMs. Ceri will therefore present initial findings from two research projects and discuss the subsequent implications for current and near future Ecodesign policy and legislation influencing the recyclability of electronic products in Europe. The research projects include a case study investigation of e-waste plastics, including understanding the challenges and opportunities to increase recycling of e-wate plastics through product design. A further project involves the analysis of critical raw materials in electronics, which revolves around understanding the challenges involved in declaring CRM content in electronics, through an applied example of laboratory analysis and supplier available information.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Assess a feasible and integrated strategy for sustainable wearable products
Mulan Mu
Sustainability & Supply Chain Continuity Manager
Fitbit
As we innovate to introduce more health and fitness trackers and smartwatches to make health available to everyone, we looked into the concepts of modularity, repairability, and reliability, and if they could be executed all at once on a wearable device like Fitbit. Should different strategies be considered to meet the business bottom line of quality, cost, and customer experience? To meet the sustainable product bottom line of phasing out non-circular plastics, incorporating more recycled materials, and eliminating harmful chemicals? We will present a few Fitbit examples and hope to initiate conversations with participants at the conference to discuss a path forward for the industry.
 

9:50 am (CET)

Green innovations in products and solutions by Huawei
Anders Andrae
Senior Expert Life Cycle Assessment
Huawei Technologies
Huawei’s hypothesis is that digitalized industries can make their operations smarter and more sustainable. As a result, the company is convinced that ICT can help reduce the footprint in main societal and industrial sectors more times than its own. Especially green of 5G and green by 5G are instrumental enablers of such outcomes. Regarding ICT's own footprint, Huawei systematically reduces its own and related emissions by adhering to international standards. Promoting environmental protection is one of Huawei’s sustainability strategies and several goals are set and met. We here focus on our recent green innovations in products and solutions such as 5G. Supply chain initiatives are also outlined.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

Presentation title to be confirmed
Steven Clayton
Regulatory Affairs Manager
Samsung Electronics
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed
 

11:10 am (CET)

Closing the loop for plastic in electronic products: main drivers, challenges and key success factors
Dr Marta Jakowczyk
Program Manager: Take Back and Recovery Ops EMEA
HP
Plastics can be considered one of the most important discoveries of the past century. Due to their tremendous advantages such as ease of manufacturing, versatility, durability and low cost, plastics have become the 'new metals' in electronics manufacturing and other sectors. However, plastic has also become a growing environmental issue due to its petroleum-based (non-biodegradable) baseline. Conscious of the environmental impact, the implementation of open-loop recycling solutions (although more environmentally friendly) were still far from being the holistic solution. More recently, aligning with the circular economy trend, closed-loop plastics recycling initiatives (in which post-consumer plastic is collected, recycled, cleaned and compounded to make new consumer products), addressed the issue definitively. HP Inc's experience in closed-loop recycling with ink cartridges started 16 years ago, but more recently the tech giant established a commitment and challenged itself to expand this process to the hardware space. The plastics closed-loop system is a complex puzzle which requires high focus in all stages including; channel partner relationships, take-back schemes from customers, conscientious consumers and recycling partners, recycling, compounding, molding, product design, qualification and manufacturing. HP joined partners with the same vision to develop of an end-to-end solution. Like any other complex industrial process, the solution must define and scale-up an economically beneficial outcome for all partners involved. Marta's presentation highlights the drivers, challenges, success factors, and the continued learnings of this innovative, groundbreaking process.
 

11:35 am (CET)

Sustainable solutions for electronics, photonics and diagnostics
Liisa Hakola
Senior Scientist
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
Electronics, photonics and diagnostics made of sustainable materials can offer a potentially cost-effective alternate in various applications and meet the needs to use renewable materials. Sustainability can be addressed from different perspectives: 1.) By utilizing materials originating from renewable resources; 2.) By utilizing compostable or bio-degradable materials; 3.) By effectively reusing/recycling materials, components and products (circular economy); 4.) By designing products tailored for circular economy (eco-design, circular design); and/or 5.) By using energy- and material-efficient manufacturing processes, such as roll-to-roll compatible printing technologies.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Not repeating the mistakes of the past: the demand for sustainable solar energy technology
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council (GEC)
Alexander Klonick
Manager, Education & Engagement
Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance (REBA)
Andreas Wade
Global Sustainability Director
First Solar
Max Scher
Head of Clean Energy & Carbon Programs
Salesforce
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
System-wide responses to tackling e-waste: circular from end to end
1:15 pm - 5:30 pm (CET)

1:15 pm (CET)

The importance of responsible re-use in a circular economy
Corey Dehmey
Executive Director
SERI - Sustainable Electronics Recycling International
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

1:40 pm (CET)

Sustainable hardware: a vital foundation for renewable energy projects
Patty Dillon
Senior Director - Criteria & Category Development
Green Electronics Council (GEC)
Access to energy has provided tremendous societal benefits but at a price; the 1,000-year-long half-life of spent nuclear fuel to the climate change impacts of fossil fuels. Renewable energy, especially solar, seeks to provide energy without that same environmental cost. But what is the environmental impact of solar panels and inverters? The Green Electronics Council (GEC), a mission-driven non-profit that envisions a world of only sustainable technology, has launched a PV Modules and Inverters product category under its ecolabel EPEAT. Learn about the EPEAT criteria and the environmental impacts they address. Understand the role of Salesforce and the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance (REBA) in utilizing EPEAT.

2:05 pm (CET)

Implementation of circular economy for electronics: a product design perspective
Rainer Pamminger
Senior Researcher
Vienna University of Technology
Circular economy (CE) is a concept aiming to maintain the value of products, materials and resources in the economy for as long as possible and generating waste is minimized. To realize CE, there is a need for circular designed products as well a new business models, which enable the circularity. This presentation will introduce circular design and business model strategies e.g. longevity, modularity, pay per use, etc, and highlights related best-practice examples on the market. For practical implementation, a method to select the relevant circular strategies for a specific product and further methods to develop circular products are demonstrated.

2:30 pm (CET)

Nanoclay reinforced nanocellulose: a wood-based substrate for recyclable and rollable electronics
Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz
Group Leader/Associate Professor - Department of Health Technology
Technical University of Denmark
E-waste generation has become a major concern in the modern society. Major components of traditional electronics are composed of non-biodegradable inorganic materials such as ceramics and various metals. On the other hand, modern electronics are gradually shifting to flexible, lightweight and even stretchable materials, which in turn can help get rid of the traditional rigid substrates and minimize the use of metals in the electronic devices. Various polymeric substrates have been introduced into the electronic industries such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), and polyimide (PI) – they are all suitable for a broad range of applications ranging from energy, transistors to biomedical devices. However, the waste generation from these flexible electronics remains a major concern due to the use of non-biodegradable and toxic synthetic polymers. Therefore, there is a great deal of research and development to develop biodegradable electronics to ensure the waste generated from the electronics will be non-toxic and environmentally safe. Naturally derived polymers are a good substrates for green electronics application due to their intrinsic enzymatic degradability. However, their poor mechanical and thermal barrier properties are a major obstacle in this regard. To this end, a lightweight, flexible and even rollable substrate has been developed using environment friendly nanoclay and nanocellulose materials for rollable electronics (rotronics) applications. Nanocellulose is a wood-based materials and has been explored as bioderived and biodegradable materials. In this presentation, Professor Dolatshahi-Pirouz will demonstrate that the nanoclay with nanocellulose can yield flexible, strong, transparent, thermally stable, and low cost paper for rotronics applications. Moreover, the materials are inexpensive and easy to process; therefore the manufacturing process of the nanocomposite paper makes them more industrially viable.

2:55 pm (CET)

Securing the rare earth permanent magnet supply chain in Europe
Ana Maria Martinez
Senior Research Scientist
SINTEF
Rare earth elements (REE) are instrumental in the full deployment of green-technologies towards decarbonization. Currently, it is forecasted an increasing demand of REE in Europe, mainly for NdFeB-permanent magnets used in highly effective motors for electric vehicles and wind turbine generators. Utilizing permanent magnets from discarded products and appliances as supply material in permanent magnet manufacturing allows a complete closed-loop permanent magnet recycling process, namely from wastes to new products. The development of cost-effective and environmentally friendly REE-extraction technologies opens-up the possibility of securing an important value chain in Europe, giving a promising market opportunity for a recycling business.

3:20 pm (CET)

Organic semiconductors of the future
Dr Ankur Sharma
Lecturer/International Education Partnership Coordinator
ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science
Ankur will speak about his research into a new class of organic semiconductors that have applications in building electronic devices of the future. His aim is to fight e-waste by building a new class of semiconductors which are biodegradable and can be recycled completely. His research has been published in high-impact peer-reviewed journals and aims to fight growing concerns around e-waste due to high consumption of electronic devices.

3:45 pm (CET)

WEEE plastics recycling
Richard McKinlay
Head of Consulting
Axion
Axion is one of the leading recyclers in plastics derived from WEEE and automotive shredding. Recycling of plastics from WEEE brings several challenges and opportunities. With growing concerns over legacy additives and persistent organic pollutants (POPs), new innovative solutions need to be developed. Richard's presentation will cover the current reality for recycling of plastics from WEEE and how infrastructure and technology may need to be adapted in the coming years to maximise recycling.

4:10 pm (CET)

Toxics in, toxics out: how do we stop the circulation of toxic additives from plastics?
Karolina Brabcova
Toxics & Plastics Adviser
Arnika/IPEN
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

4:35 pm (CET)

A new high-performance life for plastic waste: halogen-free flame-retardant compounds for electronics based on on recycled ocean-based plastics
Yoan Lavergne
Marketing Director
Lavergne
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

5:00 pm (CET)

refurbed: the refurbished market as a driver for the circular economy
Kilian Kaminski
Co-Founder & CEO
refurbed
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

5:25 pm (CET)

Presentation title to be confirmed
Sebastian Daus
Co-Founder & CEO
FixFirst
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

5:50 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Systematic and cultural barriers to electronics re-use
Jan Hoogstrate
Executive Director
Free ICT Europe Foundation
Kilian Kaminski
Co-Founder & CEO
refurbed
Sebastian Daus
Co-Founder & CEO
FixFirst
Arjen Workum
Network Consultant
Aliter Networks
Fredrik Forslund
Vice President, Cloud and Data Center Erasure Solutions
Blancco
The transition toward a circular economy requires huge changes to production and consumption systems, going way beyond resource efficiency and recycling waste. What we know from the recently published E-Waste Monitor is that electric and electronics equipment is being scrapped at an alarming rate instead of being salvaged, fixed and re-used. Circular material use, including recycling, re-use and refurbishment, aims to reduce the generation of waste as well as our dependence on extraction and imports of raw materials. As such, it can bring both environmental and economic benefits, and it is increasingly recognized as the resource use mechanism that would allow societal and environmental sustainability. However, numerous factors exist that limit opportunities and instances of re-use of electrical and electronic equipment, such as systemic and consumer barriers such as producer reluctance, unsuitable collection infrastructure and cultural issues. This panel will delve into some of these barriers and explain how effective models can be implemented, which will help us move successfully toward a resource-efficient, circular economy.

Day2: November 19, 2020

Exploring routes to re-use for discarded EEE: toward a circular economy
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Facilitating trade along circular electronics value chains
James Pennington
Lead, Circular Economy & China Partnerships
World Economic Forum
Kimberley Botwright
Community Lead, Global Trade and Investment SI
World Economic Forum
Circular strategies have become a priority for many companies and consumers. Typically, though, these strategies will rely on reverse supply chains and these are not always supported by current regulatory environments. James and Kimberley's discussion presents insights from a series of dialogs, a survey and interviews on the challenges in reverse supply chains for electronics. These are centered on complexities of product classifications, related factors leading to significant increases in the costs of reverse logistics for used products and those characterized as hazardous versus outbound logistics for new products, and cumbersome trade‑permitting processes, particularly for products classified as hazardous.
 

9:25 am (CET)

E-waste Down Under: reforms and action in Australia
Professor John Gertsakis
Adjunct Professor/Director and Co-founder
The Institute for Sustainable Futures/EWaste Watch
Rose Read
Director & Co-founder
eWaste Watch
This presentation will provide a forthright update on the state of play of e-waste management in Australia. It will highlight recent policy and regulatory reforms as well as commentary on industry performance, consumer expectations and new Commonwealth Recycling and Waste Reduction legislation that is seeking to encourage increased producer responsibility for electrical and electronic products, including solar panels and batteries.
 

9:50 am (CET)

100% plastic-free solution for packaging PCBs in wearable technology
Fanya Ismail
CEO
SGMA (Sol-Gel Coatings & Advanced Materials Ltd)
Plastic pollution and climate change are the hot topics and major challenges the world is currently facing. Sustainable solutions are urgently needed by the market. SGMA is a clean-tech venture with a sustainable solution to provide an alternative to plastic and a route to create effective non fossil-fuel based chemicals. Plastic waste in food packaging and protecting PCBs in wearable technology is current focus areas of SGMA. SGMA technology is made from sand extracts. SGMA barrier coating for Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs) provides a non-toxic and environmentally friendly solution to replace plastic in protecting and packaging PCBs in wearable technology. Meanwhile increasing the efficiency and doubling the lifetime of the wearable items through an extended number of washing cycles.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

From zero carbon supply chains to circular electronics: steps to more sustainability
Dr Constantin Herrmann
Principal Consultant & Team Lead Metals, Manufacturing & Electronics
thinkstep/Sphera
Sustainability is a long term task for industry and always a challenge that is so far supposed to be demanding, costly and needs continuous care and efforts – just to have good marketing and reputation in place. Recent developments in society, politics and industry turn the page into a true business case. Zero carbon supply chains and zero carbon scope is a key question for future stable business. This presentation from Dr Herrmann will demonstrate approaches to satisfy OEMs seeking carbon-neutral products in a zero carbon Europe, will detect links on topics in the broad field of sustainability and will explain why circular economy is key aspect for CO2 neutral electronics.
 

11:10 am (CET)

Designing electronics for the circular economy: let's rethink our brake to e-waste generation
Kévin Le Blevennec
Circular Economy Researcher
VITO
Designing sustainable products and addressing issues posed by key value chains such as electronics is higher than ever on the EU political agenda. Recent VITO research results on the quality of collected WEEE, the design of solar modules for circularity, or again the role of digital technologies for enhancing waste management, can only reinforce this need to integrate holistic approaches connecting different product life-cycle stages and stakeholders at an early design and development phases. While electronics will keep penetrating new market opportunities and niches for enabling the digital transformation, we urgently need to rethink and propose new methodological approaches for efficiently organising the integration of ecodesign approaches.
 

11:35 am (CET)

Supporting a closed-loop economy, by maximizing recycling and recovery of materials and by minimizing waste and reducing the environmental footprint
Arthur Schwesig
Head of Research & Development
Bage Plastics
bage plastics has mastered the complex process of repurposing plastics from diverse sources of e-waste for the circular economy. As Arthur will reveal in his presentation, during 2020 the Austroa-based recycling specialist reinvented plastics upcycling and at E-Waste World Virtual Summit is presenting its new portfolio to help producers get to the circular forefront with their future electronics product iterations. A brand-new UL yellow-card listed ABS with top performance for electronic appliances will be discussed, as will an enhanced recycled PP for high-end articles with true color stability, an outstanding PC/ABS with brilliant surface, and a highly efficient HIPS for white and colorful goods.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Financing e-waste management in Africa
Reinhardt Smit
Director - Supply Chains
Closing The Loop
Adrian Clews
Managing Director
Hinckley Associates Nigeria
Sampson Atiemo
Researcher
Mountain Research Institute
Guya Merkle
Founder
Vieri Fine Jewellery
Sören Enholm
CEO
TCO Development
This panel will go into the opportunities that responsible e-waste management in developing countries have to offer. The challenge of finding the right financing mechanisms is a big one, but there is light at the end of the tunnel. Experts look into this challenge and what innovative ideas are out there to tackle it.
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
E-waste challenges: re-use practices and principles
1:30 pm - 4:30 pm (CET)

1:15 pm (CET)

Implementing the waste hierarchy thanks to the re-use of e-waste by social enterprises
Mathieu Rama
Senior Policy Officer - Environment
RREUSE
Mathieu Rama will showcase the role of re-use social enterprises in implementing the waste hierarchy via prioritising re-use and preparing for re-use over recycling when dealing with e-waste. He will then demonstrate how EU policies can enhance this sector, notably through encouraging cooperation between all actors of the value chain, bettering the design of e-products and improving e-waste collection models to safeguard re-usability.

1:40 pm (CET)

The psychology of reused e-waste
Cris Stephenson
CEO
Environcom
As the largest UK white goods re-use business. Envirocom has access to some interesting data and conclusions on the why, how and where re-use appliances are sold. E-waste re-use needs to mature and expand out of the cottage business it is and become a mainstay of our retail landscape and more importantly of our psychological purchasing DNA.

2:05 pm (CET)

Presentation title to be confirmed
Fredrik Forslund
Vice President, Cloud and Data Center Erasure Solutions
Blancco
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

2:30 pm (CET)

Enlarging the loop, a crucial measure for the circular economy
Jan Hoogstrate
Executive Director
Free ICT Europe Foundation
One of our key challenges in closing the loop is to include extending the life-cycle of products; stimulating repair/maintenance, re-use, upgrading and refurbishment. Operational experts in this are often independent companies, which might be operating too much in stealth mode. An increasing awareness has already led to new EU legislation and more to come. A fair level playing field in both B2B and B2C markets needs to be created to stimulate the circular economy and to keep value assigned to well running equipment. How do they do it?

2:55 pm (CET)

Developing a Producer Responsibility Organisation (PRO) model with the Government of Georgia: insights and lessons learned
Morton Hemkhaus
Project Manager
adelphi research gemeinnützige
The Government of Georgia has introduced an Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) system for e-waste in order to increase the collection and recycling rate and reduce the proportion of landfilled materials. It obliges producers to bear the responsibility for the proper handling and disposal of their products and is mandatory since December 2019 under the Waste Management Act. On behalf of UNDP and the NGO Georgia's Environmental Outlook, adelphi supported the government of Georgia in developing a model for a Producer Responsibility Organisation (PRO) serving as a compliance service provider to Georgian producers. Morton's presentation will summarize the key insights and the lessons learned.

3:20 pm (CET)

Presentation title to be confirmed
Kyle Wiens
CEO & Co-founder
iFixit
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

3:45 pm (CET)

Sustainable IT procurement for normal people
Joost de Kluijver
Founder
Closing the Loop
Purchasing IT in a more sustainable way is easy. And it can be done today, in a commercially interesting way. Since its commercial start in 2014, Closing the Loop has been a pioneer in circularity for tech hardware. The company serves demanding customers that are often reluctant to choose sustainability over usability, and works in an industry that needs to improve its sustainable image. As a result, Closing the Loop developed highly pragmatic circular services. Closing the Loop's waste-compensation services are used for commercial/customer value as well as to create positive impact for the tech industry and its stakeholders. Closing the Loop now works with industry leaders, government and most of all just normal people to deliver on the need for a green service that's a no-brainer. Join Joost for what is sure to be an engaging presentation to find out how!

4:10 pm (CET)

Creating circular solutions for electronics: case studies in closed- and open-loop re-use and recycling models
Jelle Slenters
EU ITAD Head of Business Development
Sims Lifecycle Services
Redefining e-waste as e-material, the opportunity to create change, Jelle's presentation showcases industry-leading examples of advanced partnerships that leverage circular design principles, closed-loop systems and responsible business models to support the transition to circular electronics manufacturing, distribution, use and disposal for re-use and recycling. Each case study illustrates the steps in the pathway toward sustainable circular solutions with great positive environmental and social impact throughout the entire value chain.

4:35 pm (CET)

Reducing e-waste :practical experience from the front line
Anthony Levy
CEO
Cistor
A candid view of the challenges facing technology manufacturers and business consumers in reducing e-waste, including some myth-busting, repeatable real-life success stories, and how technology can be more sustainable.

5:00 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Development and demonstration of WEEE prevention and re-use paradigms
Mathieu Rama
Senior Policy Officer - Environment
RREUSE
Chloé Mikolajczack
Sustainability Consultant
Restart
José Manuel Portas
Project Technician
AERESS
Astrid Lebrun-Frisdal
Responable ESS
Eco-systémes
According to the waste hierarchy, repair and re-use should be the first treatment operations applied to e-products that are not functioning or not used anymore. However, they are too often discarded prematurely in collection models designed to collect recyclables, restricting their potential lifetime. This is partly due to the fact that repair operations are often too difficult or too expensive to be conducted. This is clearly a missed opportunity to save resources and create sustainable jobs. This panel discussion aims at identifying the solutions that exist in the EU to extend the lifetime of e-products through improving the collection models, setting eco-design requirements on durability and reparability and fostering the development of re-use activities.

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