Sustainable & Circular Electronics Agenda

Green & Sustainable Electronics

Day1: November 30, 2021

Keynote presentations
9:00 am - 12:15 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Circular Electronics: “How to move the needle on your circular performance on a company and product level - a Telecom sector case-study
Mart Beune
Senior Manager Circular Economy & ESG Strategy
KPMG
The world today is only 8.6% circular. But do you also know what the circular performance of your company or product is? Circular metrics are emerging and developing at a rapid pace. The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), together with a group of companies, developed the Circular Transition Indicators (CTI) framework to enable companies to measure and steer on their circular performance. A case study will be presented of a leading European Telecom operator and how this company navigates the (data) challenges in moving towards a circular business.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Is France a paradigm of circular economy regulations? -Developments in other selected EU markets.
Julia Feuring
Senior Legal Counsel
1cc GmbH
With the Anti-Waste Law for the circular economy no 2020-105 of February 2020 (AGEC law), France created the legal basis for a consistent, national path towards a circular economy. In the meantime, several implementing laws have been established for the Anti-Waste Law. Some of these impose challenging requirements on the manufacturers of products in scope. These include requirements for the availability of spare parts, durability, recyclability, and reusability of products. It also creates incentives to include more recycled content in product design. Currently, this law is a hot topic of discussion, and manufacturers of affected products are looking with trepidation at the very dynamic legislative developments in France. New planned obligations can be reported almost monthly. The focus in the pursuit of circular economy requirements is on France. But does a manufacturer keep everything under control if he follows the French requirements and is compliant here? Other EU markets follow France as a model and create similar requirements to strengthen the circular economy in the country. Still other EU markets, however, focus on other measures to strengthen the circular economy and implement their strategies and commitments or go beyond the requirements set in France. The presentation is intended to show the different developments in the EU markets in the implementation of a circular economy and to answer the question, whether France is currently really the benchmark or whether the other Member States with no less demanding measures do not pose equally high challenges to manufacturers.
 

9:50 am (CET)

Sustainability and Producer Responsibility Organizations
Wojciech Swietochowski
Head of Global Sales
Landbell AG
Sustainability is not just about recycling or ‘being green’. Being sustainable means considering environmental aspects along the whole lifetime of a product - from design until end of life. The whole lifetime of a product involves many stakeholders. That’s why the 2018 revision of the European Waste Framework Directive set new minimum requirements for producers responsibility organisations (PROs). It also called for Member States to strengthen enforcement by 5 January 2023. From setting modulated fees to ensuring adequate monitoring and enforcement, PROs will have an increasingly important role to play in Europe’s waste and resource landscape. Right now, policymakers are particularly focused on products that are put on market via distance sales - even more so given the surge in online sales since the Covid-19 outbreak. To create a level playing field for all producers and online marketplaces, some Member States have already introduced new obligations. This paper reviews these new requirements and explains how PROs can help companies to fulfil them.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

Beyond E-Waste Management for Electronics Sustainability
Corey Dehmey
Executive Director
SERI - Sustainable Electronics Recycling International
Everybody’s talking about a Circular Economy. But what does that really mean when it comes to electronics? Further, is “Circular” enough as an end goal? This session will explore the various channels for building towards a circular economy and beyond through electronics sustainability. What role do Standards and Certification play in moving the needle? How can programs in education, government, and business stimulate progress? And, fundamentally how do we shift thinking from managing e-waste to eliminating the concept of waste altogether?
 

11:10 am (CET)

To be announced
Steffen Vangerow
Managing director & Board Member
Vangerow GmbH & Runder Tisch Reparatur
 

11:35 am (CET)

Panel Discussion - The Circular Electronics Partnership: implementing our 2030 roadmap
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council (GEC)
Reinhardt Smit
Director - Supply Chains
Closing The Loop
Jelle Slenters
Head of Business Development EMEA - Global ITAD and Re-Use
Sims Lifecycle Services
According to the Global E-waste Monitor 2020, in one year, a staggering 50 million metric tonnes of e-waste are generated. Of this total amount, more than 40 million tonnes of e-waste are discarded in landfill, burned or illegally traded and treated in a sub-standard way every year. Under the current linear economy conditions, the consumption of resources (metals, plastics, chemicals) will increase and with it the amounts of e-waste generated.This session will explore e-waste landscape and trends, introduce a new industry-led initiative that responds to it and hear directly from its members as to the actions they’re taking to achieve a more circular electronics industry.
 
Networking Session -
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
Circular Photovoltaics & Solar Recycling
1:30 pm - 2:45 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

To be announced
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council (GEC)

1:55 pm (CET)

Circular business opportunities in the PV supply chain - lessons from the CIRCUSOL project
Tom Rommens
R&D Manager, Unit Sustainable Materials Management
CIRCUSOL & VITO
Solar PV has been a key engine powering the energy transition. As the number of installed PV modules on the market rises, circular material management and resource efficiency are becoming increasingly critical factors for the long-term success of this technology. Circular economy and renewable, clean energy need to go hand in hand, to safeguard a truly sustainable transition towards a low-carbon future. CIRCUSOL is an Innovation Action project funded by the Horizon 2020 program of the European Commission, investigating the options to evolve towards circular business models in the solar power industry. In the past three years, we addressed the following questions: • What are the environmental benefits of PV lifetime extension and/or reuse, compared to replacing old installations with newer, more efficient installations? • How to develop a viable 2nd life market for PV with short, regional loops? • How to prevent “leakage” of low quality discarded PV modules to countries with poorly developed waste management systems. Some interesting findings and lessons for the future will be presented.

2:20 pm (CET)

PHOTORAMA – A circular approach towards a sustainable photovoltaic industry
Claire Agraffeil
Project Manager
CEA/INES (Institut National de l'Energie Solaire)
The IRENA projections have already announced 60-78 million tons of Photovoltaic (PV) wastes worldwide and about 10 million tons in Europe. Considering the context of the climate change issue, solar energy has become the best candidate to lead the energy transition and move towards the carbon neutral paradigm. A huge deployment is expected in the coming decades and this will consequently increase the amount of PV waste while the current recycling solutions are mostly inefficient in terms of materials recovery. In order to challenge downcylcing practises, the PHOTORAMA project funded under the European Union’s H2020 programme is currently implementing a comprehensive circular model focused on developing innovative recycling technologies.

2:45 pm (CET)

Re-use of PV Panels: Challenges or Opportunities?
Jan Clyncke
Managing Director
PV Cycle
The European WEEE Directive 2012/19/EU states general rules to distinguish used electrical and electronic equipment versus waste electrical and electronic equipment by the fact of the existence of an invoice/contract, evidence of functionally by testing, and adequate packaging. The largest obstacle for applying the existing definition is the unclear requirement of the functional state of PV Panels concerning performance and safety. In summary, according to our assessment, PV Panels are by design long-lasting products. Under the condition of existing well-regulated and controlled schemes for their technical inspection, repair and final treatment the re-use is feasible, clearly and socially desirable. The economic viability of the sector is currently achieved in low-income countries as clearly proven by the fact that most worldwide and European actors export towards these regions. PV Panel re-use in developed countries is currently only viable for niche applications and its uptake will depend if/how CO2 footprint of electronic products will be integrated in the product cost. Overall, the unclear legislation, the lack of control of the WEEE directive, and the nearly complete lack of similar legislations outside the EU raise serious environmental and safety concerns about the re-use of PV modules. At the dawn of the first decommissioning wave of PV systems, followed by an expected rapid rise of the volumes of re-usable PV Panels, we ask for a careful assessment of the sector and its adequate regulations in concertation with the relevant global actors

3:10 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion: To be announced
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council (GEC)
Networking Session -
3:40 pm - 4:10 pm (CET)
 
Taking Electronics Circular
4:10 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

4:10 pm (CET)

The future role of EPR schemes, the Italian case study – initiatives and projects
Luca Campadello
Project & Research Manager
ERION
In the priority sectors for circular economy, e-waste and waste batteries are facing challenging times. How to reach the targets for the return rates, how to support OEMs in circular economy initiatives with innovative solutions and how to face complexity in recycling and preparation for reuse. To give an overview on good practices, European projects (NONTOX for plastics, BELT for energy labelling, Circular Housing for new business models) and innovative initiatives (EXCEED for professional WEEE) will be showcased.

4:35 pm (CET)

Fit for the requirements of Circular Economy
Clemens Kitzberger
Business Development Manager Application Post Consumer
EREMA Group GmbH
The plasticcontent of electronic waste isabout 20 -25%. The recycling rate of electronic waste within the EU is35 % and in Austria 41 %. To achieve the EU's recycling target of 55 % by 2025, it ́s necessary to boost the recycling rate of these plastics too.

5:00 pm (CET)

Take-back programs and product design - essential success factors closing-the-loop
Dr Felix-Michael Weber
CEO
MBA Polymers Group
Post-consumer plastics saving enormous amounts of greenhouse gases compared to the production of virgin from petrochemicals, based on the MBA Polymers process we save up to 4,8 tons of CO2 per ton produced for our customers. These facts are increasing the demand for post-consumer plastics in particular made out of WEEE. For designing and producing high quality plastics and to ensure efficient recycling processes, partnerships with industry leaders producing IT equipment, consumer goods, cosmetics or automotive are essential. Additionally efficient take-back-programs are supporting the customer awareness and contribute to a more efficient treatment of WEEE or other post-consumer feedstock. Theses partnerships increase the efficiency and finally the rates of efficient separation of polymeric materials from highly complex waste products in order to to clean, sort and purify the resulting plastics by type and grade until they’re ready for re-use in demanding applications. We will give best practice insides and suggest requirements for take-back programs replacing virgin plastics and closing the loop.

5:25 pm (CET)

Offering a perspective for the public?
Friso Visser
Project Lead
REPLAY project
Science Centres and Science Museums master the art of science communication. Nowadays the discussion is on many topics like inclusion, participation and, the new kid on the block, activism! How do we get people moving in a sustainable direction? Show and Tell or do we use radical methods? From a very practical point of view, taking a tour through a museum and showing some samples of how to involve the audience in re-ycling/up-cycling and e-waste, a focus is put on some lessons learned. Be gentle, don’t rub it in, soft-selling does it vs show what is wrong and dictate how people should behave: what might work in terms of empowering society? The presentation looks at how Museon, a museum dedicated to education and a family-audience, is trying to get people moving in a sustainable direction. The REPLAY project being a typical example of how the museum successfully reaches out to the public on e-waste issues. Friso Visser is a museum-professional who works at Museon in The Hague (Netherlands) as Head of Education & Exhibitions/Deputy Director. He was trained as Museologist and later studied Geology, starting his carrier in 1989 as museum-curator in that field. After having worked in several European research projects on ICT and Museums, he joined PriceWaterhouseCoopers as senior consultant at the turn of the century. As PwC consultant he was seconded at the European Commission around the turn of the century to work on the IST programme on ICT and museums, archives and libraries. In 2005 he started the digital-library activities for the Dutch Library Association (Bibliotheek.nl). Returning to the museum field he works now at Museon on the renewal of the museum and its education programmes with a focus on Sustainable Development.

Day2: December 1, 2021

Eco-principles in consumer electronics: redesign, repurpose or refurbish
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

R(e)-Sourcing Materials
Efrat Friedland
Founder/Materials Strategist
materialscout
If we are here, today, discussing E-Waste, this means there is still a lot of it to be collected and managed. We should enhance the value of this waste to make sure designers can reuse it, users can appreciate it and the industry will keep it in the system. How to facilitate that? This talk will walk you through key principals to consider when designing circular products.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Making circular tech relevant for commercial people
Joost de Kluijver
Founder
Closing the Loop
The two words that are probably most used in presentations on circularity are 'should' and 'just'. These words highlight that circular thinking mostly focuses on the (distant) future, and that it often lacks pragmatism (circular change is hardly a concept that is 'just' implemented; it requires huge effort). Joost will talk about a missing link for the tech industry: short term, commercial benefits that result from circular business models. And how that link results in action, implementation, engagement and experience. His talk will not be theoretical. It will showcase a circular service that is used by OEMs, tech producers and governments - and is funding e-waste reduction in the developing world.
 

9:50 am (CET)

Systemic change through multi-stakeholder collaboration
Marcel Jacobs
Executive Director
ARCTIC - Alliance for Responsible Circular & Transparent procurement of ICT
ARCTIC - Alliance for Responsible Circular and Transparent procurement of ICT brings together joint statement of demand. Three product categories have been selected - mobile (smart) phones, laptops and data centers Four stakeholder groups collaborate on three key priorities 3 key deliverables Buyers speaking with a single voice: Harmonize and standardize demand, Secure buying organisations commitment (public & private sector) through consolidated criteria. Awareness raising: Increase Knowledge at both market and demand (buyers) side (topics Circular Economy, Business models, Circular/Sustainable procurement). System change: stakeholder collaboration striving for a breakthrough in innovation covering overall system, products/solutions, infra structure processes, procurement, market. The process is managed through 6 workstreams that: Raise awareness & increase knowledge Define harmonized criteria & align standards Simplify & standardize (procurement) processes Clarify impact of products, services & solutions Identify supporting policy tools Drive system innovation For more information please check www.arctic-alliance.com which explains and outlines the relevance of a global multi-stakeholder initiative
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

The handling of old electronics in private households and concepts for improvement
Alexander Suessmilch
Managing Shareholder
CIRECON
In German households 32 million tons of electrical waste is stored, resulted in an inquiry of the Bitkom 2018. The reason for that we found out with our survey. We asked over 500 end consumers what happens to their unused electronic equipment at home and why their readiness to dispose of old units is so low – this is shown by the low recycling rates of 45% in Germany. Our survey result show a clear trend into higher willingness to recycle if the right take-back concepts are presented by manufacturers, dealers and other companies obliged to collect and take back e-waste units. Join our presentation to find out more on the solutions for waste of electrical and electronic equipment and find out more on www.cirecon.de.
 

11:10 am (CET)

Do e-textiles require specific legislation to avoid harmful waste?
Jessica Saunders
Programme Director
London College of Fashion
E-textiles are a rapidly expanding body of materials, with extensive prototyping and market testing being carried out globally with potential fashion, military and medical applications. This is leading to novel combinations of nano materials, electrical components and fibres with a challenging waste profile. A small number of researchers such as Kohler 2011,2013 [2,3] and Veske, P. et al. (2019) have identified the need for regulation in this area and have highlighted the potential environmental impact of e-textiles. These emerging textiles are partially covered by a myriad of directives and legislature from three very separate disciplines which means there is potential for e-textiles to find their way into landfill due to their position on the edges of WEEE and REACH legislation in the EU and UK. E-textile developers are calling for action to clarify the position of e-textiles in legislature and to define related standards. Furthermore as a budding product area there is time to engender environmentally aware design for disassembly practice into new products. How this is brought about and what it looks like is an important part of e-textiles journey to the mass market, requiring cross disciplinary discourse with stakeholder and policy maker engagement.
 

11:35 am (CET)

Fast Tracks: a requirement for a Circular Economy of Electronic Wastes
Chris Slijkhuis
Board Member
European Electronics Recyclers Association (EERA)
The current way how waste shipments are organized should undergo a serious re-think, as it impedes proper recycling rather than supporting this. The presentation will dig into the procedures for shipping waste across borders, it will share the experience of how a new classification of plastic waste was introduced and how Switzerland and Ghana have proposed to name all E-Waste as hazardous waste. E-Waste is an important raw material for valuable secondary raw materials, of executed properly and therefore compliant E-Waste recyclers need to get easy access to these raw materials.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion: How do we build momentum for societal change to create demand for non-new products and recycled materials
Anthony Levy
CEO & Founder
Circular First
Efrat Friedland
Founder/Materials Strategist
materialscout
Cris Stephenson
CEO
Environcom
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
Exploring routes to re-use for discarded EEE: re-use practices and principles moving toward a circular economy
1:30 pm - 4:00 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

When the Circular Economy Meets Environmental Justice
Jim Puckett
Executive Director & Founder
Basel Action Network (BAN)
Global waste trade expert and environmental justice advocate for over 30 years, Jim Puckett of the Basel Action Network (BAN) makes the case that too often the Circular Economy (CE) proponents seek to confuse the CE with what has been called the Circle of Poison –when developing countries are exploited as depositories for banned products or polluting wastes. He notes how quickly many have forgotten two of the three fundamental pillars of the CE – preservation of natural capital and the elimination of externalities. Jim makes the case that the trade in wastes has always primarily been about exploiting negative externalities which lies in direct conflict with principles of environmental justice and with a true Circular Economy. He cites examples of how industry and some governments seek to run away from the Basel Convention due to its effectiveness in halting the export of harm.

1:55 pm (CET)

Reverse engineering embedded systems to reduce e-waste
Maurits Fennis
Founder/CEO
Unbinare
Unbinare is an e-waste reverse engineering laboratory. We will discuss the practice of reverse engineering within the context of sustainability by covering a set of hardware analysis and knowledge creation techniques employed in the reverse engineering of e-waste. We will demonstrate hardware tools that we have developed internally and how simple tools that are cheap, easy to obtain or easy to produce can support grassroots organizations in reducing the rise in e-waste.

2:20 pm (CET)

The changing face of Reuse
Cris Stephenson
CEO
Environcom
As the largest UK white goods re-use business. Envirocom has access to some interesting data and conclusions on the why, how and where re-use appliances are sold. E-waste re-use needs to mature and expand out of the cottage business it is and become a mainstay of our retail landscape and more importantly of our psychological purchasing DNA.
Networking Session -
2:45 pm - 3:10 pm (CET)
 

3:10 pm (CET)

The value we throw away: understanding and reducing IT EWaste through complementary channels for reuse.
Anthony Levy
CEO & Founder
Circular First
We will discuss powerful and scalable ways to reduce waste and create value for manufactures and technology users by creating trusted end to end solutions. eWaste is the tip of the iceberg in the waste cycle created by IT, it is simply the bit we can see at the end of use. Minimising waste through the entire lifecycle needs a joined-up solution from manufacturers, service providers, and the technology users themselves, we will explore these ideas, and real-life solutions in this presentation.

3:35 pm (CET)

Reducing E-Waste by extending the Use Phase (with support of SME’s)
Jan Hoogstrate
Executive Director
Free ICT Europe Foundation
Crucial contributions should be embraced. Good behaviour shown in one situation, can this be copied to another? With organisations spending 64% of the ICT sales, what should they do to contribute and become more sustainable? Free ICT stands for Freedom of choice, looking forward to meet you!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This