E-Waste Recycling Agenda

E-Waste Challenges & Opportunities

Day1: November 30, 2021

Opening Plenary & Keynote Sessions
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Latest insights on the global overview of e-waste statistics, management, legislation and outlook to 2050.
Kees Baldé
Senior Programme Officer at the Sustainable Cycles Programme
United Nations University
It’s often stated that electronic waste is a fast growing waste stream currently peaking at 53.7 Mt per annum and less than 20% is recycled. But what will happen to it in future if nothing substantial changes, or if we undergo a circular economy transition? How does the COVID pandemic impact? What are the regional challenges and opportunities? The presentation will touch upon the latest insights and facts of global e-waste flows, management, legislation and provide an outlook what’s needed to meet the UN Sustainable Development Goal targets for sustainable consumption and production for electronic waste. It will zoom into various regions, looks into the future, and discuss the economic opportunities and the boundary conditions to manage e-waste.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Future perspectives on global transboundary movement in e-waste
Dr Rolph Payet
Executive Secretary
Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
With the advent of information technology and the Internet of Things, the increase in e-waste at the global level reached 50 million metric tons in 2018 and if nothing is done it is expected to reach 120 tons annually by 2050, with only about 20% making it to proper recycling facilities. Concomitantly, the export of e-waste, legal or illegally, to countries with little or no facilities for its recycling is leading to increased human exposure and the release of toxic chemicals into the environment. The presentation will focus on emerging issues and information with regards to transboundary movement of e-waste.
 

9:50 am (CET)

Circular contexts for e-waste
Dr Shane Colgan
Expert - Circular Economy
European Environment Agency
The European Green Deal has set unprecedented sustainability ambitions and mandates a move away from our unsustainable use of materials. Moving to a more circular economy will reduce our dependency on scarce natural resources and mitigate concerns over access to critical raw materials. Value retention strategies such as eco-design, remanufacturing and high-quality recycling are at the core of the circular economy. These actions increase resource efficiency and offer a strong pathway to a green recovery and lasting prosperity.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

An enhanced vision of EPR and the role of all actors
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
The WEEE Forum, a prominent representative of Producer Responsibility Organisations (PROs) throughout the world, has developed a new vision which calls for an overhaul of the current system of extended producer responsibility, including targets, which it claims is not fit for purpose. Based on recent research undertaken by the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and against the background of very few EU Member States being able to meet the 2019 collection targets for WEEE despite enormous progress being made in tackling the increasing amount of e-waste generated, the WEEE Forum lays out four vital steps that need to be taken to ensure the system is fair and achievable. The first is what is termed as the #allactors approach: a policy model whereby all private and public entities that have access to WEEE and therefore are involved in the collection, logistics, preparation for reuse, refurbishment, treatment, or recycling of WEEE, or in the associated monitoring, legislative and enforcement activities, are subject to minimum legal obligations regarding, amongst other things, compliance with legislation, reporting to the competent authorities and, meeting official standards and communication. The #allactors Approach means all actors have legal obligations which competent authorities must enforce to ensure that all actors contribute in line with their requirements. This approach will result in more fairness and inclusivity in the market as well as enhanced monitoring based on sustained cooperation.
 

11:10 am (CET)

Value Recovery Redefined When Retiring IT Equipment
Jelle Slenters
Head of Business Development EMEA - Global ITAD and Re-Use
Sims Lifecycle Services
The electronic recycling industry has evolved and matured since it emerged in the 1990s. Awareness is growing around corporate compliance and environmental sustainability. Organisations are working with industry-leaders to reimagine the equipment disposal landscape through the lens of sustainability. Today, the entire IT infrastructure ecosystem is evolving quickly. Changes in IT infrastructure, end user equipment and increased interest in asset reuse and closed loop recycling allow us to reimagine how we handle used IT equipment. These changes give us a unique opportunity to improve how we manage used electronics using data driven information to manage the lifecycle of IT assets. Designing and manufacturing durable and recyclable equipment will unlock previously unavailable sustainability gains. Until recently, financial returns and data destruction were primary outcomes of successful IT asset disposition (ITAD) and recycling programs. Today’s leading companies are seeking ways to measure the overall environmental impact of owning and using IT equipment, most often using carbon emissions, or greenhouse gas emissions, as the baseline measurement for environmental impact. This session will look back at the evolution of the recycling industry in the last 30 years and discuss reimagining IT Asset lifecycles and sustainability measurements in eWaste recycling programs. It will look at case study examples with companies who have built sustainability into their equipment disposal decision making processes, with demonstrable, measurable results and share recommendations on redefining what can be considered value recovery when retiring your IT assets.
 

11:35 am (CET)

Thematic impact financing opportunities under InvestEU
Francois Gaudet
Head of Thematic Impact Finance Operations
European Investment Bank (EIB)
Under the European Commission’s 2021-2027 programming period a number of initiatives are available to support circular economy. This session explores financing opportunities offered by the European Investment Bank under its Thematic Impact Finance programme using InvestEU’s Green Transition Investment Facility resources. The presentation will cover general eligibility considerations, structures used to tackle innovative circular economy projects and a case study to illustrate.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

Circular Electronics: Insights into three pilots on consumer behaviour change
Imke Schmidt
Projektmanager
Collaborating Centre on Sustainable Consumption and Production (CSCP)
CIAP is an European multistakeholder initiative, designed to support the transition to circular electronics. The goal is to better understand consumer behaviour related to electronics and engaging consumers in a meaningful way when it comes to fostering more circular behaviours. The guiding question is: How might we innovate to enable people to reuse, repair, share, return, recycle or lease their devices?
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
System-wide responses to tackling e-waste: circular from end to end
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

LCD Recycling, Industry 4.0 and Circular Economy
Dr Lisa Maria T. O'Donoghue
Founder & CEO
Votechnik
In a world, where electronic devices have become more important than ever, allowing us to keep connection during the pandemic, social distancing, and home working, we see trends of double monitor displays at the home office as well as at the work office accompanied by an increase in purchasing home entertainment devices. The seismic impact of this consumer behavior will be felt in the years to come. There is a need to depollute these displays of hazardous materials as well as recovery the value of the metal. While the current manual recycling processes are just about keeping up with the LCD volumes, the clock is ticking to the point where speed and cost will be too much. However, the requirements here are not simply that of technology but more importantly a business model that embraces circular economy. This is especially poignant when the back bone of the EU recycling sector are SME companies. The EC Project ALR4000 is tackling this dual challenge and will present the results of "where full automation & robotics with industrial 4.0 meets innovative circular economy business models".

1:55 pm (CET)

Electronics recycling – current and future challenges for end-processing (focus on precious and other critical metals).
Steven Art
Project & Supply Manager
Umicore Precious Metals Refining
E-waste end-processing (end-refining) has shown resilience to a change in material quality and availability since years. Smelting & refining operations, like Umicore PMR, treat e-waste blended with other materials in large scale installations. This leads to high recovery yields and this of a broad range of (critical) metals. It will continue to exist, possibly together with other, new end-processing technologies to tackle the e-waste challenge, ideally in synergy, rather than in competition. A future challenge will be the recycling of the other critical metals (EU critical metals & conflict minerals) with a lower economical value, in a sustainable way.

2:20 pm (CET)

ANDRITZ Recycling Technology Center – not only for e-scrap trials
Franz Frühauf
Sales Director
ANDRITZ Recycling
Almost one year ago, ANDRITZ opened its Recycling Technology Center near Graz, Austria, and has thus considerably expanded the range of services available to its recycling customers. The ANDRITZ Recycling Technology Center – ART Center for short – is equipped with innovative shredding technology from the ADuro product line and enables recycling tests under real plant conditions with industrial-scale equipment. The ADuro shredders can be used for primary and secondary shredding as well as for fine granulation and dismantling of composite materials. The materials tested cover a wide spectrum, ranging from electronic waste to rejects, plastics or other waste streams. Since ANDRITZ is a leading supplier for e-scrap recycling plants with more than 60 reference recycling plants for WEEE/e-scrap and cooling appliances, it is natural that the ART Center was equipped with ANDRITZ’ technical innovation for e-scrap recycling – the ADuro QZ shredder. The machine breaks down different composite materials quickly and gently using rotating chains so that the individual fractions (like iron, plastic, printed circuit boards, cables, and copper coils) are exposed and can be easily separated from one another in downstream processes. Several trials with various types of e-scrap and different composite materials were conducted in the pilot plant. Exemplary showcases prove the main benefit for customers and partners. With the simulation of complete processes new recycling projects and investments can be planned easily and investment risk is reduced to a minimum.
Networking Session -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 

3:15 pm (CET)

How the latest developments in sensor-based sorting can provide new opportunities for WEEE recyclers.
Terence Keyworth
Segment Manager Metal North/East Europe
TOMRA
This presentation will highlight not only some new developments in sensor-based sorting, but also how a clever use of sensor-based sorting machines can lead to improved process efficiency, increased recovery rates of valuable materials and higher purity of final products.

3:40 pm (CET)

A data-driven approach to EPR compliance
Frederik Eisinger
Head of Environmental Compliance Management
Reverse Logistics Group
Managing Extended Producer Responsibility, especially for multinational corporations, is about managing complexity. Keeping track and monitoring EPR legislation around the waste of electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), batteries, packaging (and more areas) can be an enormous challenge. Although in principle similar in all EU member states, the specific requirements of the national EPR regime differ from country to country. Managing this complexity requires knowledge about the legislative requirements as well as having accurate data. Especially for EPR reporting, a comprehensive and consistent data structure is key as requirements in terms of templates, level of detail required, and reporting categories differ, sometimes from EPR compliance scheme to EPR compliance scheme within one country. In his presentation, Frederik Eisinger shares the RLG approach to EPR compliance that builds on a comprehensive set of product and transactional data attributes. He will lay out how a consistent data structure on environmental product attributes helps companies ensure EPR compliance. With modulated fees being introduced in more and more countries, having the correct data also enables companies to manage costs and more easily realize cost-saving potentials.

4:05 pm (CET)

From knowledge exchange to action – piloting treatment and financing solutions to e-waste management in low and middle income countries. Lessons learnt from PREVENT Projects
Daniel Hinchliffe
Advisor Sustainable Solid Waste Management and Circular Economy
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
The PREVENT Waste Alliance is a global multistakeholder initiative which exchanges on and develops solutions on pressing e-waste and plastic pollution problems. Following its launch in 2019, discussion and knowledge exchange has moved to action, as the members of the alliance now implement pilot projects in over 15 countries. This presentation shares insights from the pilot projects of the PREVENT e-waste working group, which aim to develop treatment and financing solutions to improve e-waste management in contexts where currently dangerous, toxic and polluting informal recycling dominates. These projects address needs both globally – such as connecting markets for off-takers to recyclers - and more locally on the ground, for example in Ecuador, Tanzania and Nigeria.

4:30 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion: Using pilots to drive systemic change – what does it take to scale long term treatment and financing solutions to e-waste management?
Daniel Hinchliffe
Advisor Sustainable Solid Waste Management and Circular Economy
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
Andreas Manhart
Senior Researcher Products & Material Flows
Öko-Institut
Kingsly Akamewane
Landbell Group/European Recycling Platform
Implementing activities on the ground through pilots brings more tangible results than desktop studies. But how do we move from the piloting stage to larger change on a societal level? What are the key factors? Bringing together different implementing organisations from the PREVENT Waste Alliance, this panel will discuss how implementation of pilots can move into broader approaches to support longer term change that supports wider sustainable e-waste management globally.

Day2: December 1, 2021

Global solutions to a global problem: international perspectives on e-waste
9:00 am - 12:15 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Facilitating the environmentally sound transboundary movement of e-waste – an innovation challenge
Ines Knäpper
Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation
World Economic Forum
To bring fresh ideas to solve old problems, the Global Alliance for Trade facilitation together with its partners the Government of Rwanda and Enviroserve, is organising an innovation sprint – also known as hackathon - that brings creative minds from all over the world, knowledge from different disciplines, and field-experts in the world of e-waste together for 60 hours in a virtual environment to work on tangible solutions for better materials reprocessing and collection and transboundary movement of e-waste. We hope to present the results of this innovation sprint during the e-Waste World conference.
 

9:25 am (CET)

KEEP all materials, each component, every origin - learnings from the innovation project
Krisitna Liljestrand
Project leader, KEEP
Chalmers University of Technology
Electronics waste is increasing at a rapid pace. Fifty million metric tonnes of old electronics are discarded every year. KEEP aims to change this by creating a traceability solution for electrical and electronic products. KEEP has gathered 14 partners from the whole lifecycle to facilitate information sharing through a traceability solution that collects information about the product from all stages. This will help everyone involved to reduce waste, retain value and extend the life of products. At the presentation, Kristina Liljestrand can present the project from process to output and learnings from the collaboration. The project is based in Sweden and unique in its kind. Read more about the project here https://xd.adobe.com/view/432af1e2-42a2-4484-6ad4-802aa7ec41c9-351b/?fullscreen
 

9:50 am (CET)

Valuable materials recovery from waste printed circuit board at Remind (Recycling Materials for Indonesia)
Muhammad Dzikri Ahira Soefihara
Graduate Student
Delft University of Technology
Remind, “Recycling Materials for Indonesia”, is built to participate in solving e-waste management’s issue in Indonesia. We currently focus to recycle valuable materials from waste printed circuit boards. Collection, pre-treatment, metals recovery, and waste management are the main processes conducted at our pilot factory. We have demonstrated that this route is practically feasible and economically beneficial to recover metals, particularly gold. To improve the recovery, we recently added shaking table equipment to assist the pre-treatment process. Preliminary tests showed that this improvement contributed effectively to separate the high-valuable materials (gold concentrate) from less valuable materials (plastic).
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

System-wide responses to tackling e-waste: circular from end to end
Craig Campion
Director of ITAD Services
Stone Group
 

11:10 am (CET)

Transitioning Africa into the Circular Economy
Malcolm Whitehouse
Business Development & Compliance Manager
AST Recycling
With Africa being a dumping ground for the modern world’s e-waste through deferred dumping, rather than being a problem, should be seen as an opportunity to create sustainable jobs, (especially post Covid 19) create value, and clean up the environment. Less than 0.9% of all e-waste generated in Africa is recycled formally, out of 2,9 million tons placed on market annually. Transitioning into a circular economy can be attained through collaborative partnerships, networking and sharing of skills and information across the continent.
 

11:35 am (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: What role can and should the private sector take in reaching solutions for e-waste management in low and middle income countries?
Reinhardt Smit
Director - Supply Chains
Closing The Loop
Andreas Manhart
Senior Researcher Products & Material Flows
Öko-Institut
Adrian Clews
Managing Director
Hinckley Recycling
Kevin Yang
Technical Product and Compliance Manager
AOC International Europe B.V. | MMD Monitors & Displays B.V
 
Networking Session -
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
Mining e-waste: a vital source of secondary raw materials and key to unlocking the circular economy
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

Robotic recycling technologies – helping to grow the circular economy
Austin Ryan
CCO
FPD Recycling
Consumer electronics have changed a lot in 20 years – look how our TVs have gotten thinner and smarter. But if you look at their end-of-life phase - not much has changed. The E-waste industry is in urgent need of a safe and profitable process for handling and recycling screens, locally, in the country of origin. The same way automation has revolutionised electronics' manufacturing, it can change its end-of-life processing. Advanced robotic recycling technologies allow us to move away from the take-make-waste linear model to a circular economy. It is now time to start looking at the e-waste as a source of valuable materials, rather than harmful, toxic waste that is pushed around until it ends up in landfills around the globe.

1:55 pm (CET)

Refining of precious metals from electronic waste with maximum efficiency, through the use of automation and integrated hydrometallurgical processes.
Marco Guolo
CTO and Sales Manager
Osai

2:20 pm (CET)

Metallurgical E-waste Recycling as an Integral Part of the Circular Economy
Dr Stefan Konetschnik
Managing Director
UrbanGold GmbH
The presentation summarizes the possibilities of metallurgical processing of copper and precious metals containing fractions from e-waste. The first part of the presentation deals with the status of the metallurgical recycling industry using Europe as an example. The positioning of the metallurgy in the circular economy and the waste hierarchy are shown and discussed. Deficiencies of the established system are highlighted and possibilities to overcome them are offered. Furthermore, the technical and economic hurdles when setting up a metallurgical recycling facility are presented. Topic of the last part of the presentation, are the steps for planning, developing, and realizing a recycling project.
Networking Session -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 

3:15 pm (CET)

Metso Outotec eScrap Solutions – unlocking the value
Lauri Närhi
Head of smelting solution
Metso Outotec
The presentation will introduce Metso Outotec and it’s capabilities to provide sustainable solutions of the processing and refining of e-scrap. We will identify some of the most common eScrap facilities’ design challenges and share some insights on the economics of investing in a e-scrap smelter.

3:40 pm (CET)

Biomining – the future for low-CO2 recovery
Andy Hanratty
Head of Business
Mint Innovation
Mint Innovation will introduce the benefits of their precious metal recovery technology in terms of local reprocessing versus international shipping of waste and the commensurate cost and carbon savings to be gained.

4:05 pm (CET)

Sustainable, resource and energy efficient recycling of e-scrap
Andreas Nolte
Head Of Quality Management
Aurubis
Aurubis is processing more than 100,000 tonnes of e-scrap fractions annually. The multi-metal process ensures the recovery of up to 20 elements to commodities or intermediates for further extraction. Sustainable recycling means being fully compliant and committed to directives, laws, ordinances, responsible sourcing and standards. Energy efficient implies using best available technology and Aurubis smelter network to optimize energy demand and carbon footprint of metals extraction. Facts and figures will demonstrate today´s state of the art e-scrap recycling.

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