E-Waste Recycling Agenda

E-Waste Challenges & Opportunities

Day1: November 18, 2020

Opening Plenary & Keynote Sessions
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

E-waste – the underestimated challenge
Dr Ruediger Kuehr
Director/Head
UNU-SCYCLE/UNITAR Bonn
A record 53.6 million metric tons (Mt) of electronic waste was generated worldwide in 2019, up 21% in just five years, according to the UN’s Global E-waste Monitor 2020, released recently. The new report also predicts global e-waste - discarded products with a battery or plug - will reach 74 Mt by 2030, almost a doubling of e-waste in just 16 years. This makes e-waste the world’s fastest-growing domestic waste stream, fueled mainly by higher consumption rates of electric and electronic equipment, short life cycles, and few options for repair.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Circular economy: if we really mean it…
Jim Puckett
Executive Director & Founder
Basel Action Network (BAN)
Environmental justice activist, Jim Puckett, will examine how many proponents of a circular economy have forgotten the basic prerequisites required to achieve it - namely: global equity, cost internalization, valuing natural capital, and design for circularity and transparency. In the time of a global pandemic where only the IT-related industries are benefitting financially, he challenges industry to step up and show they really mean to create a just and circular economy.
 

9:50 am (CET)

Future perspectives on global transboundary movement in e-waste
Dr Rolph Payet
Executive Secretary
Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
With the advent of information technology and the Internet of Things, the increase in e-waste at the global level reached 50 million metric tons in 2018 and if nothing is done it is expected to reach 120 tons annually by 2050, with only about 20% making it to proper recycling facilities. Concomitantly, the export of e-waste, legal or illegally, to countries with little or no facilities for its recycling is leading to increased human exposure and the release of toxic chemicals into the environment. The presentation will focus on emerging issues and information with regards to transboundary movement of e-waste.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

Recycling and material markets: functioning markets or a need for regulation?
Manfred Fahrner
Senior Adviser
European Electronics Recycling Association (EERA)
Recycling reduces our carbon footprint, preserves resources and reduces pollution. It is a common belief that scarce natural resources will increase costs for raw materials and will make recycling more viable. Recent events show that raw material markets are very volatile, often making it difficult for secondary materials to compete. The production of primary and secondary raw materials are independent and show different costs but do compete in the same markets. Many stakeholders call for measures to support the market chances of recycled products. Mandatory content of recycled material in new production seems an obvious and easy solution for recyclers and environmentalists, but is this realistic?
 

11:10 am (CET)

Issues of greatest concern for the WEEE sector
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
In their attempt to turn the EPR principle into an effective electronic waste management policy approach, the producer responsibility organizations in the WEEE Forum – and the WEEE sector in general – are grappling with various challenges. For example, most WEEE is not officially collected and is treated irresponsibly, and therefore the collection targets are unreachable. The EU is preparing guidelines around eco-modulation of fees, yet we need to understand how to harmonize the rules. And the EU is exploring ways in which the WEEE treatment standards can be made legally binding. Pascal will walk this year's online audience through those challenges.
 

11:35 am (CET)

Hardware hacking: the overlooked cybercrime
John Shegerian
Co-founder & Executive Chairman
ERI
Today, data is now stored on devices not traditionally considered 'hackable'. Due to technological advances, many organizations are now faced with major issues pertaining to their electronics for fear that their private or personal data will be compromised – especially with the growing number of people now working from home due to the COVID pandemic. As a result, the recycling of e-waste has indeed become an issue that transcends environmental responsibility, moved into the realm of privacy protection and hardware hacking prevention. John's keynote talk will cover the broad array of technology that now contains data and what to expect on the horizon… and what next steps should be in the world of e-waste recycling.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: The elephants in the (WEEE) room
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
Manfred Fahrner
Senior Adviser
European Electronics Recycling Association (EERA)
Dr Mathias Schluep
Program Director
World Resources Forum
Elisabeth Smith
Executive Director
StEP Initiative - Solving The E-Waste Problem
Pascal's panel discussion will invite the assembled list of panelists to debate some critical issues for the WEEE sector. For instance, only a handful of Member States will attain the WEEE collection target. What does this signify and how can it be improved? Europe is too dependent on third-world countries for its advanced and critical raw materials used in high-tech applications. How can we boost the EU’s resilience? By 2023, the EU expects a scheme for eco-modulated fees to be in place across Europe. How can we make it a success? Fires at recycling plants caused by batteries in WEEE is an issue of growing concern. Can we tackle it adequately? And with International E-Waste Day being 14 October, the primary purpose being to educate the world about e-waste, how do we reach the younger generation?
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
An industry ripe for disruption: WEEE recovery and re-use for tomorrow
1:30 pm - 5:30 pm (CET)

1:15 pm (CET)

Fast Tracks: a requirement for a circular economy of electronic waste
Chris Slijkhuis
Board Member
European Electronics Recyclers Association (EERA)
In the European Union, the principle for the free movement of goods involves the removal of all trade barriers between the member states, once a product or article is lawfully placed on the market. This principle does not count for recyclable wastes. The Waste Shipment Regulation restricts the cross-border traffic of wastes and an ever-increasing amount of wastes types need notifications. This is a hugely complex administrative procedure, which involves much time and money. For recycling companies, this is a competitive disadvantage compared to the producers of primary raw materials which can move freely within Europe. This presentation outlines the concept of “Fast-Track Notifications” facilitating recyclable wastes to move more easily between compliant recycling companies within the EU. The Circular Economy plan for the EU simply shouts for simplifications in these waste shipment rules for recyclable WEEE fractions.

1:40 pm (CET)

Selective disassembly of composites: the potential of continuous shock wave technology
Stefan Eisert
CEO
ImpulsTec
The innovative shock wave fragmentation technology of ImpulsTec generates shock waves in water that enables material selective disassembly of composites. Over the past two years, ImpulsTec has improved the technology and achieved some continuous shock wave systems for industrial applications, such as mobile phones, metalized plastics, batteries and semiconductor materials. The material selective fragmentation process enables the separation between different valuable materials and hence lead to higher added value for the customers. Stefan will present several examples that underline the high potential and the application fields of this selective fragmentation technology.

2:05 pm (CET)

End-of-life management and energy efficiency: are they two sides of the same coin?
Luca Campadello
Project & Research Manager
ERION
A circular economy for e-waste touches upon many aspects, from manufacturing to end-of-life management. Luca will present two different approaches at the E-Waste World Virtual Summit, one for end-of-life management and another for bringing together different actors within the value chain. For recycling, the H2020 project, NONTOX, focuses on increasing plastic recycling rates, from the treatment of WEEE, end-of-life vehicle (ELV) and construction and demolition waste (CDW) plastics, by removing hazardous substances using the following technologies: CreaSolv, EXTRUCLEAN, PYROLISIS. For the eco-design side, the H2020 project, BELT, will be presented which involves the upper actors of the value chain, from producers to retailers and consumers. It is a project that will guide producers to the innovation on energy efficiency allowed by the future re-scaled energy label.

2:30 pm (CET)

Introducing human-robot collaboration in WEEE recycling: the HR-Recycler project
Apostolos Axenopoulos
Postdoctoral Researcher
Centre for Research and Technology Hellas/Information Technologies Institute (CERTH/ITI)
HR-Recycler will develop a 'hybrid human-robot recycling plant for electrical and electronic equipment' operating in an indoor environment, aiming to replace multiple currently manual, expensive, hazardous and time-consuming tasks of WEEE materials pre-processing with correspondingly automatic robotic-based procedures (categorization of devices, disassembling, sorting of device components). The overall goal of HR-Recycler is to create a hybrid collaboration environment, where humans and robots will harmoniously share and undertake different processing and manipulation tasks. In this presentation, the objectives of HR-Recycler project and the use cases in WEEE recycling industry will be described, while its technological solutions and expected outcomes will be demonstrated.

2:55 pm (CET)

Go green, go safe, with the digital progress of e-waste recycling
Alexander Süßmilch
Managing Shareholder
CIRECON
Looking at today’s production of electronic devices and the resulting e-waste, we see a lack of traceability for ‘end-of-life’ units. The CIRECON approach is to connect suppliers and recyclers within the electronics industry, offering them an online solution for tracking e-waste streams by improved data management along the entire supply chain life-cycle. A digital portal enables all life-cycle participating stakeholders to capture relevant recycling actions to gather all relevant data for the optimization of production methods but as well for any recycling solutions, with the target to extend the lifetime of electronic products and their components – and finally ensuring all personal data is ‘safe’ after end of life.

3:20 pm (CET)

Bio-gold from e-waste: how microorganisms support circular economy
Dr Esther M. Gabor
Programme Manager Green & Urban Mining
BRAIN
BRAIN, a German bioeconomy pioneer, has developed a biological solution for the extraction of valuable metals from secondary raw materials that is not only powerful but also mild and environmentally friendly. The natural protagonists in this process are microorganisms – identified and optimized by the BRAIN microbiology experts, they act on the secondary raw materials and extract precious metals with competitive yields. BRAIN owns intellectual property rights for the bacteria and processes used and has successfully transferred the technology from laboratory to pilot scale, the BRAIN BioXtractor. The technology is now ready to go to the next scale - together with you?

3:45 pm (CET)

Circular strategies for photovoltaics: the challenges of recycling
Claire Agraffeil
Project Manager
CEA/INES (Institut National de l'Energie Solaire)
Solar energy has experienced constant and significant growth since the 1990s. Looking at the challenge in the coming decades in terms of climate change, photovoltaic (PV) energy represents one of the first and best alternatives to reach the carbon-neutral paradigm. While the PV industry expands continuously, the question of waste management is becoming more and more important. Indeed, the cumulative volumes of PV waste expected by 2050 has been already estimated in 2016 at 60 to 78 million tons around the world, which is equivalent to 630GW – the current total capacity worldwide. Given this balance and the annual installation capacity (about 130GW in 2019), it is safe to assume that the projection of waste expected by 2050 might have been underestimated considering both the 25-30-year lifetime and early dysfunction of PV modules. Moreover, the very low cost €0.19-0.29/Wp (watt peak) and the huge potential of growth expected to meet the climate targets will accelerate the deployment of solar electricity and hence the resultant waste in the future. In addition to being a logistic priority to manage such huge volume of waste, the environmental issue needs to be carefully evaluated together with the economic perspectives. It is absolutely crucial in the circular economy era to take the whole life-cycle of PV products into account and the risks associated with the end-of-life scenarios as landfilling and down cycling current practices. Among other impacts, release of hazardous materials as well as huge resources, depletion of critical and precious raw materials are of great importance in the balance sheet. Claire’s presentation will give an overview of the recycling alternatives regarding crystalline silicon PV modules (~94% of the market). By using a systemic approach, technical, economic, environmental and social issues will be appraised to highlight the challenges of PV recycling. The second objective is to make a review of the environmental performance assessment related to the end-of-life of PV modules. Even though PV devices provide green generation of electricity during its 25-30-year lifespan, the manufacturing and end-of-life stages has to be implemented strategically in order to come to sustainable products. The manufacturing step has been largely studied through Life Cycle Analysis whereas the environmental assessment of the end-of-life remains a topic that requires further investigation. Her analysis will point out the critical issues of the early LCA outcomes regarding the end-of-life of PV modules. Drawing from a global approach, this presentation intends to underline the difficulties of PV waste management and provide incentives to focus on the necessary effort to make progress in this field.

4:10 pm (CET)

Metal recycling from end-of-use batteries promoted by CO2 capture: boosting the circular economy with a disruptive approach
Professor Julien Leclaire
Group Leader, Applied Supramolecular Chemistry Lab
University of Lyon
To reach the market, eco-efficient technologies frequently require changes of paradigm and conceptually disruptive approaches. Research in the facilities at the University of Lyon has demonstrated that combining two fluxes of waste material, namely flue gases and metal leachates from end-of-use batteries, can result in spontaneous self-sorting process wherein both CO2 and strategic metals are being extracted and purified. This low-cost, efficient, selective and flexible technology is now being applied to various typologies of NiMH and Li-ion batteries within the University of Lyon's freshly founded MeCaWaRe corporation.

4:35 pm (CET)

Mint Biorefinery: a local solution for the global PCB challenge
Dr Will Barker
Founder & CEO
Mint Innovation
Mint Innovation has developed the world's first biorefinery for recovering valuable metals including gold, palladium, copper and tin from circuit boards. Mint's low-cost, high-efficiency approach enables domestic value capture, mitigating the reliance on international smelters and transboundary shipment of hazardous materials. The low-carbon approach returns all these valuable metals back into the local economy, providing a true circular solution for one of the most challenging waste streams. Mint's biorefinery solution is ready for deployment in a city near you.

5:00 pm (CET)

The quest for a better recycling yield
Heinz Böni
Head of Research Group CARE (Critical Materials and Resource Efficiency)
Empa - The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology
Lorena Toledo Reyes
Scientist within the Critical Materials and Resource Efficiency (CARE) Group
Empa - The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology
The widely accepted indicator in determining e-waste treatment performance regarding material circularity is the recycling rate. However, it has several shortcomings, particular when addressing the recovery of scarce technology metals (STM). In this presentation, Heinz and Lorena will present latest results in a series of experiments which should lead to a better monitoring of the STM yield in a fleet of Swiss e-waste treatment facilities.

5:25 pm (CET)

Presentation title to be confirmed
Josef Tapper
CEO
Recipo
Presentation symopsis to be confirmed

5:50 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Combating the global e-waste crisis with re-use done right
Corey Dehmey
Executive Director
SERI - Sustainable Electronics Recycling International
Kyle Wiens
CEO & Co-founder
iFixit
Julie-Ann Adams
Managing Director
Really Green Credentials
Martin Series
Director Sourcing
Global Resale

Day2: November 19, 2020

Global solutions to a global problem: international perspectives on e-waste
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

International shipment of used and waste electronics: navigating the legal jungle
Katharina Kummer Peiry
Owner & Principal
Kummer EcoConsult
In today’s globalized market, managing materials and wastes in accordance with the widely recognized concept of a circular economy often involves international shipments. To ensure sustainable management of the materials at every stage of the process, and also to avoid costly delays and sanctions, shipments of used and waste electronics must be carried out in accordance with the applicable laws of the countries involved. Given the complexities and inconsistencies of the laws of the majority of countries, this can be an arduous task. Katharina's presentation will discuss the challenges and ways to address them.
 

9:25 am (CET)

WEEE solutions for a developing continent and region
Stuart Fleming
Co-Founder/Group CEO/Board Member
EnviroServe Group/Enviroserve Recycling
Africa and the Middle East have for some time been considered a WEEE conundrum when it comes to the basics of business – logistics and sustainability. Enviroserve has found a unique and dynamic solution, balancing growth, profit and solutions to WEEE with social, charitable, sustainable and growth requirements. But what more can the globe do to accelerate this, support it and ensure longevity to the solutions? From dismantling to high-tech ITAD solutions, multi-country collections and cross border movements, ESAfrica has been a tremendous project that is developing and growing in strength, resource and interest. But what is missing? What needs to be co-created? The E-Way, created by Enviroserve is a proven solution.
 

9:50 am (CET)

To e-waste or not to e-waste
Malcolm Whitehouse
General Manager
AST Recycling
The level of e-waste recycling in South Africa is extremely low, with 6-7kg per year of e-waste generated for every South African citizen and 360,000 tons per annum of e-waste placed on the market. Only 7-12% of this volume is being recycled formally. South African industry has been tasked with ensuring a just and green transition to an environmentally clean future. Malcolm Whitehouse, the general manager and compliance officer at AST Recycling, will discuss the legislative framework of electronic recycling, enterprise development and job creation, and share circular economy transition experiences in South Africa.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

E-waste recycling in the USA and Canada: differences in product scope and challenges for manufacturer compliance to Extended Producer Responsibility regulations
Howard Stimpson
Director of Operations
Sphera EC4P
This presentation will give an overview of US and Canada e-waste regulations plus state/provincial e-waste recycling product scope and provide detailed case studies of US state and Canadian provincial e-waste regulations, including New York and New Jersey, plus Alberta, Ontario and Yukon. New developments to the USA and Canada e-waste regulations will be included. The presentation will also discuss some of the main challenges faced by manufacturers of electrical and electronic equipment for compliance to US, Canada plus other global e-waste regulations.
 

11:10 am (CET)

Sustainable e-waste solutions in Sub Sahara Africa
Adrian Clews
Managing Director
Hinckley Associates Nigeria
Adrian will explore the challenges faced by Hinckley Recycling in establishing Niger’s first government-approved e-waste recycler. He will present the solutions developed by the company to achieve profitability and mitigate the risks associated with running an e-waste business in the Sub-Sahara. He will also discuss the next steps in growing Nigeria's e-waste sector and improving closed-loop systems post COVID-19.
 

11:35 am (CET)

Plastic sorting solution for Japan
Jelle Saint-Germain
Sales Engineer
AD REM
In 2018, Japan exported more than a million tons of plastics to Asia. The plastics that remained in the country were mainly incinerated or landfilled. Meanwhile, China and other South-East Asian countries are increasingly limiting their plastic waste imports, and an amendment to the Basel Convention will likely further restrict all international movement of plastic waste by 2021. As a result, the Japanese government has started a campaign to promote the reduction, re-use and recycling of plastics. KK Planic, a recently established joint venture between Toyota Tsusho, Veolia Japan and Kojima Sanyo, has jumped on the bandwagon and will establish the largest plastic recycling facility in Japan. In this plant, the shredded plastics are separated in different fractions based on their density using the Ad Rem flotation system. Using electrostatic separation and Galloo Plastics technology further downstream, all recyclable plastics are separated in clean fractions and eventually compounded and pelletized. The new facility will process about 40,000 metric tons a year of plastic material coming from various sources such as automobiles, home appliances, palettes and containers and packaging materials from distribution centers and shopping centers. By combining different technologies and processes, the plant will be the first of its kind, tackling the complete plastic recycling chain from A to Z.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Why is it so difficult to get e-waste on the agenda?
Elisabeth Smith
Executive Director
StEP Initiative - Solving The E-Waste Problem
Stephanie Adrian
Senior International Waste Policy & Programs Manager
US Environmental Protection Agency
Deepali Sinha Khetriwal
Managing Director
Sofies India
Alexander Batteiger
Advisor Circular Economy & Sustainable Waste Management
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Intern. Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
Joost de Kluijver
Founder
Closing the Loop
Around 130 million smartphones are binned every year in the USA alone yet a mere 1% of those sold are recycled. It's almost as if new electronics are put onto the market without any consideration for their end-of-life management at all – or the 59 million tons of e-waste they helped generate globally in 2020. Donors, meanwhile, are granting funds for projects to increase the use of electronics in emerging markets, yet the management of those products is not included within the proposals. Companies across the board seemingly don't care what happens to those products when they become waste, especially in the absence of legislation. And despite the success of the recent International E-Waste Day on 14 October, the awareness campaign also coincided with Amazon's Prime sale offer with cut-price electronics available to millions upon millions of people. So how can we bring this issue to the fore and get it on a par with plastic pollution or other climate emergencies? Join this fascinating panel discussion at E-Waste World Virtual Summit to have your say
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:15 pm (CET)
 
Toward a more circular economy for WEEE management: in practice and in theory
1:15 pm - 4:30 pm (CET)

1:15 pm (CET)

Using compensation programs to combat toxic e-waste
Sören Enholm
CEO
TCO Development
TCO Development, the organization behind the global sustainability certification TCO Certified, now gives purchasing organizations the opportunity to take responsibility for the e-waste they generate. Through TCO Certified Edge, E-waste Compensated purchasers and the IT industry have a powerful tool for combating e-waste and reducing the thousands of tons of toxic e-waste that is illegally dumped in vulnerable regions every year. During the presentation, Sören will go through the program and talk about how buying certified IT products can make sure that an equivalent amount of e-waste is collected and recycled in a safe way. Delegates will get insight into the roll-out and interest in the compensation program as well as challenges and success factors.

1:40 pm (CET)

Co-working spaces for inclusive e-waste management
Dea Andrea Wehrli
Research Associate and Co-Founder of E[co]work - A Social Impact Startup
Empa - The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology
E[co]work is a novel concept based on the co-working concept of shared infrastructure that addresses the issue of integrating the informal sector into formal take-back and recycling systems. Envisioned as a self-sustaining business model, the E[co]work facility is a compliant e-waste facility that rents its infrastructure to informal micro-entrepreneurs, giving them access to a formal workspace with proper equipment and tools, without requiring extensive capital investment upfront. The participatory design process for its implementation in Delhi, India, shows that the concept has merits for micro-entrepreneurs and compliance with regulations and has further crystallized key challenges for the adoption of the concept.

2:05 pm (CET)

Reclaiming polymers from WEEE through chemical recycling
Dr Robert De Ruiter
Business Development Plastics & Circular Economy - Circular Economy, Environment and Sustainability
TNO
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

2:30 pm (CET)

ALR4000: EU project to tackle LCD recycling and market challenges
Dr Lisa Maria T. O'Donoghue
Founder & CEO
Votechnik
The ALR4000 is a European Union project delivering a fourth-generation patented technology to automatically recycle LCDs and address the requirements of the EU market. While LCD volumes continue to grow, their emergence at recycling facilities has been distributed via large-scale and small-scale recyclers, resulting in a two-tier structure in the market. Innovative business models as well as innovative technologies are required to address these needs. Lisa's presentation will focus on how the ALR4000 project is doing this for the EU LCD recycling sector.

2:55 pm (CET)

Enabling a world without waste using AI and robotics
Matanya Horowitz
CEO
AMP Robotics
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

3:20 pm (CET)

The development of new ways to recycle electronics using bacteria
Professor Sebastien Farnaud
Professor, Faculty Research Centre for Sport, Exercise & Life Sciences
Coventry University
Bioleaching is a natural process that has been used in the mining industry for years to extract metals from ores, however this is the first industrial application to solving the e-waste problem. More than 50 million tons of e-waste is generated each year. Current recycling methods for electronics can be harmful to the environment and human health. Dismantled circuit boards are often exported to countries, predominantly in Asia, where the metals are recovered mainly through incineration. As well as poisoning the water supply and food chain, the workers carrying out the process are exposed to toxic components and fumes. Using bioleaching technology is a natural, economical and safe alternative, which can address major environmental and economic issues. N2S, one of the UK’s market leaders in IT life-cycle services, has partnered with Coventry University through the Knowledge Transfer Partnership programme, funded by InnovateUK. N2S are using the expertise of Associate Professor Farnaud and Professor Derek Renshaw from the Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Life Sciences (CSELS) to develop the technique into real industry practice. Bioleaching as a sustainable solution for recycling e-waste was also supported and presented as a major alternative for IT recycling at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs’ (DEFRA) conference ‘Helping Businesses Achieve Sustainable Outcomes’.

3:45 pm (CET)

Efficient WEEE recycling: the BlueMetal process
Dr Rolf Degel
Vice President, Non-Ferrous Metals and SAF
SMS Group
Nikolaus Borowski
Project Manager Order Handling/Sales
SMS group
Today, more than 45 million tons of waste of electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) are generated worldwide with the tendency to increase over the next years. With its valuable metal and especially precious metal content, it is no surprise that this 'waste stream' is a valuable raw material source. So professional recycling is not only an ecological advantage, but offers economic incentives. SMS group offers various tailor-made solutions from pre-treatment over the smelting and refining up to final high-grade products for an efficient recovery of these valuable metals. This holistic recycling approach, where up to 98 percent of these metals can be completely recovered and converted to pure high-grade metal products trades under the name 'BlueMetal process'. The key component of the recycling plant is the BlueSmelter, which is based on bath smelting technology. Through an innovative gas injection combined with an intelligent process design, the BlueSmelter permits the smelting and recycling even of low-grade materials with high organic shares. This advanced bath smelting technology is in comparison to existing bath smelters more flexible in terms of acceptable feed mix and operability and is financially attractive due to its compact design. Due to the potential low-grade of the materials to be smelted, gas treatment becomes a very important aspect for such a plant. Advanced gas cleaning solutions make sure the exhaust air will not contain any environmentally harmful substances such as mercury, bromine, fluorine or chlorine. The product of the BlueSmelter is a valuable metals rich so-called 'black-copper' which either can be sold to the market or further treated in the BlueMetals plant. The BlueMetal's plant refines the black copper to raw copper in a first step generating a lead and tin rich slag. The raw copper is subsequently either casted, granulated or atomized depending on the following process route. No matter which route is chosen, the final products are always high-grade metals that are sold to the market. Currently SMS installs a WEEE recycling plant applying a TBRC as a primary smelter near Moscow, which will process about 6,000 tons of printed circuit boards a year to LME/LBMA grade metals, such as copper, nickel, gold, silver and platinum.

4:10 pm (CET)

Smart sorting: artificial intelligence as a tool for e-waste recycling
Dr Katrin Bokelmann
Head of department Urban Mining
Fraunhofer IWKS
To close material cycles and respond to the challenges of new types of fragmentation technologies, the development of adapted sorting processes is necessary. Intelligent solutions are required to meet the increasingly complex and heterogeneous material flows. Fraunhofer IWKS has developed a highly flexible sorting process based on a modular sorting plant, which allows any variation regarding sequence, skipping and repetition of individual process steps. Concentrating valuable materials in certain fractions and removing pollutants are among the most important objectives of sorting. Finding the right adjustments for sorting requires the variation of countless parameters. The use of multiple sensors increases the effort for fine-tuning immensely, as it is often uncertain which parameters interact with each other and where to find a process window that is optimal for a specific case. This is where artificial intelligence can be used to accelerate complex experimentation processes. Through machine learning it should be possible to 'train' the sensors for a specific target fraction and to find correlations that remain hidden to the human observer. The aim is to achieve an efficient and robust sorting process in order to be able to react flexibly to different input materials. A systematic and continuous collection of all operational data enables a detailed evaluation of the processes from a scientific as well as an economic point of view. Opportunities and challenges of this approach will be discussed by Dr Bokelmann with e-waste as an example.

4:35 pm (CET)

Voluntary e-waste take-back programs and circular economy strategies
Dora Caria
Head of Circular Economy Engineering Solutions
Landbell Group
E-waste is currently one of the fastest-growing waste streams in the world and with narrower innovation product cycles, the problem is far from being solved. Some countries have implemented Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) systems which clearly set out targets for electrical and electronic producers and their products when they reach end-of-life. However, producers may pursue other voluntary take-back initiatives to support their circular economy strategies. How can voluntary e-waste take-back programs, on top of EPR obligations, be a catalyst for circular economy strategies? What are the challenges, key benefits, and potential solutions for designing and implementing a multi-country e-waste take back program? All these questions and more will be answered by Dora during this presentation.

5:00 pm (CET)

Presentation title to be confirmed
Richard Peagam
Associate Director - Global Producer Responsibility
Anthesis Group
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

5:25 pm (CET)

Circular credits mechanism to incentivize recovery and recycling of e-waste in emerging markets
Pedro Moura Costa
Co-Founder & Director
Circular Action Hub
Waste collection and recycling in middle- and low-Income countries are very low, in a large part as a result of the limited incentives to drive the collection of waste materials and insufficient resources to develop the necessary recycling and waste management infrastructure. This also applies to e-waste. BVRio’s Circular Credits enable companies to extend their responsibility to countries without EPR obligations, while creating positive social impacts to the low-income groups mostly responsible for waste recovery in developing countries.

5:50 pm (CET)

GEKAP: a new approach to the e-waste market
Rifat Ünal Sayman
Chairman
REC Turkey
Turkey introduced a new green fee in 2020 on producers for their products they put into market. The aim of this Recovery Contribution Fee (GEKAP) is to increase the collection and recycling/recovery rate of e-waste, waste batteries, packaging waste and waste oil. Turkey is the second country after Hungary in Europe, which has introduced product fee for their waste operations. Turkey is planning to establish an Environmental Agency responsible for the coordination of waste operation and allocate product fee to the waste sector. The presentation will focus on the main aspects of the new system and compare it with the producer responsibility organization schemes.

6:15 pm (CET)

Time to stop mine extraction: the use of ethical metals is good, but the use of ethical and ecological metal is even better!
Serge Kimbel
CEO
WeeeCycling
The extraction industry is responsible for about 50% of global emission of CO2. Stopping the mined extraction of gold, copper and other metals is necessary. WeeeCycling is a French refiner of precious metals only coming from e-waste or industrial waste. By using its recycled metals, the company's clients are reducing for about 95% of their carbon footprint linked to the usage of those metals. Serge will explain more during his presentation.

6:40 pm (CET)

A cost-effective and sustainable alternative used for the extraction and recovery of precious metals from WEEE
Duane Nelson
CEO & President
EnviroLeach Technologies
Presentation synopsis to be confirmed

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