Conference Agenda

E-Waste Challenges & Opportunities

Day1: November 14, 2019

Networking breakfast
8:15 am - 8:55 am
E-Waste Challenges & Opportunities: keynote presentations
9:00 am - 12:30 pm

Session moderated by
John Shegerian
Executive Chairman
ERI
 

9:00 am

Recycling electronics: protecting the planet... and your privacy
John Shegerian
Executive Chairman
ERI
Today, the recycling of electronics faces a huge obstacle in the form of digital privacy. Many people – huge multinational corporations included – are reluctant to recycle their electronics for fear that their private or personal data will be compromised. And the fears are not without merit. The recycling of e-waste has indeed become an issue that transcends environmental responsibility – still the principle motivation – and has moved into the realm of security, privacy... even national security. In this conference-opening presentation, ERI’s John Shegerian will discuss how the electronics recycling industry is at a crossroads of dual responsibility – keep toxins out of landfills while responsibly and efficiently achieving data destruction. His message is simple – it can be done!
 

9:25 am

Bridging the distance-to-collection target
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
Producer responsibility organizations face a number of acute challenges. How can they support the member states in reaching the WEEE collection targets (bridging distance to target)? How can online free-riders be countered? And how can legally binding quality standards for treatment level the playing field?
 

9:50 am

Strategies in product take-back and recovery
Marta Jakowczyk
Program Manager: Take Back and Recovery Ops EMEA
HP, Inc
As the quantity of electronics products increases so, too, does the challenge of managing their impacts responsibly. This presentation explains HP’s strategies to eliminate e-waste and drive efficient, circular value chains. At HP Inc, the commitment to transforming its business model spans its entire value chain: from sourcing practices and operational excellence to how the company designs, delivers, recovers, repairs and re-uses its products and solutions.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Sustainable materials at Dell Technologies: closing the loop
Markus Stutz
Director EMEA Product Compliance & Environmental Affairs
Dell Computer Corporation
At Dell Technologies, the company has been moving its thinking from linear to circular. As an important part of this fundamental change, it has invested in sustainable materials where the technology giant is closing the loop on plastics, carbon fiber, gold and most recently rare earth metals. This presentation will highlight the successes and the challenges encountered so far and cover important aspects of Dell’s take-back program, which is at the heart of its circular economy activities.
 

11:10 am

End-of-life management of PV panels and trends in PV module recycling technologies – averting the crisis
Andreas Wade
Global Sustainability Director
First Solar
With photovoltaic (PV) deployment increasing exponentially, the number of PV modules that reach the end of useful life will also greatly increase after the time lag of operation, accumulating proportionately as waste. In anticipation of the large volume of waste PV modules – and to retain PV’s position as a clean energy technology – PV module recycling has become an important emerging topic, and various discussions and activities have been conducted and developed by governments, organizations and companies. Here, First Solar’s Andreas Wade will discuss how the proper management of end-of-life PV modules to recover valuable materials that can displace virgin ones is an important step toward meeting the challenge of sustainability.
 

11:35 am

Panel Discussion - Improving the e-waste scenario through better collection, treatment certification and models of circularity
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
Dr Mathias Schluep
Program Director
World Resources Forum
Maxime Furkel
Head of Government Affairs EMEA
Lexmark
Dr Tjerk Wardenaar
Senior Consultant, Energie & Milieu
PNO Consultants
 
Lunch
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
The driving forces behind a circular economy in electronics
1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session moderated by
Dr Hamid Karbasi
NSERC Industrial Research Chair - Advanced Recycling Technologies
Conestoga College

1:30 pm

E-Waste in international policy: past, present and future
Dr Katharina Kummer Peiry
Owner & Principal
Kummer EcoConsult
In addressing e-waste, international policy initially focused on prohibiting export to developing countries for dirty dismantling and burning. With the recognition of concepts such as the ‘3Rs’, waste-to-resource and the circular economy came a move to promote re-use, refurbishment and recycling, as well as efforts to distinguish between waste and non-waste in electronics. Today, new clean technologies are being promoted to save the climate, with little thought to the amount of e-waste these will eventually generate. Ensuring environmentally sound production across all sectors will be a policy challenge for the future.

1:55 pm

The role of global treaties in promoting circular economy and e-waste recycling
Dr Rolph Payet
Executive Secretary
Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
With the advent of IT and the Internet of Things (IoT), the increase in e-waste at the global level reached 50 million metric tonnes in 2018 and, if nothing is done, it is expected to reach 120 tonnes annually by 2050, with only about 20% making it to proper recycling facilities. Concomitantly, the export of e-waste, legal or illegally, to countries with little or no facilities for its recycling is leading to increased human exposure and the release of toxic chemicals into the environment. The presentation will focus on the role of Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) and international policy in addressing this issue and the way forward, including opportunities through the adoption of both legal and voluntary measures.

2:20 pm

Partnerships for sustainable e-waste management in low- and middle-income countries
Daniel Hinchliffe
Advisor Circular Economy & Sustainable Waste Management
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
Marcel Grella
Advisor Waste Management and Circular Economy Division 413 Water, Urban Development & Mobility
German Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development
This presentation will provide insights from the German Development Cooperation approach to the improvement of e-waste management systems in low- and middle-income countries and will introduce the new PREVENT Waste Alliance, which aims to improve waste management in low- and middle-income countries with companies from along the whole electronics value chain.

2:45 pm

Performance indicators for WEEE recycling: do we measure the right thing?
Heinz Böni
Head of Research Group Critical Materials and Resource Efficiency (CARE)
Empa - The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology
In essence, WEEE management has two main goals: to maximize retention of value (recycle) and minimize health and environmental risks (depollute). In other words, valuable substances are concentrated into fractions from which they are recovered, while hazardous substances are segregated into treated fractions following best available techniques (BAT) and best environmental practices (BEP). Indicators to monitor WEEE treatment performance should enable evaluation of progress against these goals. However, today’s mass-based recycling and recovery rates are mostly blind to losses of recyclable materials that occur in small mass fractions such as scarce metals. This presentation will focus on analyzing the present shortcomings of performance measurement of WEEE recycling and will shed a light on future research and development needed in this area.
Break
3:10 pm - 3:40 pm

3:40 pm

Aurubis' state-of-the-art end-processing of e-scrap
Andreas Nolte
Director Integrated Management Systems and Public Recycling Affairs
Aurubis
Aurubis currently processes around 150,000 tons per yer of recycled raw materials that originate from e-scrap, such as PCBs, depolluted devices, shredded fractions and chips. The processes fulfil the highest demands on technical, commercial and legal standards, proven by different audit schemes. Extracting metals requires a high-level expertise of pyro- and hydrometallurgical refining processes, the aim being to contribute to the circular economy of e-scrap recycling via multi-metal recycling with high recovery rates of multiple metals.

4:05 pm

Automation as a vehicle for valuable recycling
Marco Guolo
Chief Technology Officer
OSAI Automation Systems
Automation can make the recycling process efficient and reliable. Osai, as an automation provider company, has conceived a real automation application for the recycling of printed circuit boards (PCBs). The system automatically loads and sorts the PCBs and de-solders components from the two surfaces. The same inline system is then capable of fine-sorting the components through the use of machine vision with artificial intelligence, as well as high-speed robotic arms.

4:30 pm

Panel Discussion - Maximizing the value of e-waste through advanced recovery innovations
John Shegerian
Executive Chairman
ERI
Cris Stephenson
CEO
Environcom
Olivier Inhoff
Managing Partner
RECENSO & UMS
Dr Hamid Karbasi
NSERC Industrial Research Chair - Advanced Recycling Technologies
Conestoga College
Matanya Horowitz
CEO
AMP Robotics
Big business and industry leaders have taken notice that recycling e-waste is not only good for the environment but is also good business, hence recycling e-waste and e-waste management is fast becoming less of an environmental problem and more of a market opportunity. But what technologies and strategies can provide customers with a maximum economic benefit and maximum commodity return? In this panel discussion, John Shegerian, the executive chairman of the USA's largest electronics take-back and recovery specialist, ERI, will assess some of the latest technologies to turn your operations into a profitable, sustainable business.
Drinks Reception
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Day2: November 15, 2019

The road to recovery or mining to extinction
9:00 am - 12:30 pm

Session moderated by
Dr Jan Walter Schroeder
Co-Founder
CisLunar Industries
 

9:00 am

Improving knowledge and securing secondary raw materials from the urban mine
Michelle Wagner
Research Associate
United Nations University - Environment and Human Security (UNU-VIE)
Securing responsible sources of secondary raw materials (SRM) as well as increasing recycling is a complex challenge related to data availability, geographical coverage, accessibility, standardization, harmonization, interoperability, quality and thematic coverage. The ORAMA project has analyzed data collection methods and recommendations from past and ongoing projects to identify best practices, develop practical guidelines and provide training to meet specific needs to improve the knowledge of SRM from batteries, electronics, vehicles and mining waste in Europe. In doing so, it will provide best practice and information to policy-makers to make informed policy decisions to increase the supply and recycling of secondary raw materials. This presentation will focus on sharing the outcomes of the analysis performed for e-waste in the ORAMA project. A short description of the current situation of e-waste reporting and collection methods will be provided as well as a discussion of the different tools resulting from various case studies alongside prioritized recommendations. The presentation will also touch on the results for batteries and vehicles.
 

9:25 am

Increasing efficiency and effectiveness of WEEE collection and recovery
Dr Sven Grieger
Manager WEEE Services
EARN - European Advanced Recycling Network
Within the recently finalized LIFE Project ‘Critical Raw Materials Closed Loop Recovery (CRM Recovery)’, WEEE collection methods were linked to re-use and recovery by conducting and evaluating a series of practical trials in four European countries. This presentation will share experiences and knowledge gained in cooperation with retailers, recyclers, compliance schemes and charities, and will introduce policy and infrastructure recommendations relating to how to optimize WEEE collection and material recovery in the future.
 

9:50 am

Extracting gold, silver, palladium and platinum from circuit boards in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way
Peter J. Jegou
President & Co-founder
All Green Precious Metal Recovery/All Green Recycling Inc
AGR has developed, patented, operates and owns 100% of the intellectual property (IP), patented technology and trade secrets for what it believes is the most environmentally sustainable method of extracting the valuable commodities (gold, silver, copper, platinum, and palladium) from circuit boards without using harsh chemicals, as such producing ‘Conflict-Free’ gold. [The Conflict Free Gold Standard provides a common approach by which gold producers can assess and provide assurance that their gold has been extracted in a manner that does not cause, support or benefit unlawful armed conflict or contribute to serious human rights abuses or breaches of international humanitarian law.] The AGR patented process advantages include its hydrometallurgical closed-loop system eliminating air emissions without any discharge. The AGR process is an environmentally safe alternative to smelting without shredding. Its system concentrates precious bearing material from circuit boards to obtain gold, silver, palladium, platinum and copper. AGR utilizes a water-soluble solution which can be rejuvenated and recycled. This proprietary solution can and is being re-used unlimited number of times. The AGR closed-loop precious metal recovery process is highly scalable. Multiple operations could be installed within recycling or refining plants throughout the world, and require very little additional space. The AGR process has lower capital requirements than the current industry standard. Compared with smelting and other cost-intensive pyro-metallurgical recovery methods, AGR’s method can be efficiently operated in smaller facilities, as the equipment takes up considerably less space and requires substantially less labor compared to the traditional methods of chemical or pyrometallurgical processes. Currently, AGR has successfully expanded the technology and operations to produce 99.9% pure gold, silver, copper, palladium and platinum.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Changing the way e-waste is recycled through the use of environmentally friendly technology
Duane Nelson
President & CEO
EnviroLeach
Duane Nelson will discuss EnviroLeach’s proprietary environmentally friendly solution to extract precious and strategic materials from ores, concentrates and e-waste. This new and unique formula, which is non-cyanide and non-acid based, is one of only a handful of chemical compounds known that can dissolve gold into a solution, which is a critical step in gold mining. The leach kinetics, efficiency and safety of the EnviroLeach formula is superior to that of cyanide and its alternatives without environmental consequences. Duane will explain all of the benefits of the innovation and how he envisages EnviroLeach becoming a core participant in the circular integration of the technology supply chain by converting the e-waste of today into a sustainable source of metals for the technologies of tomorrow.
 

11:10 am

Developing innovative approaches to biometallurgy
Dr Will Barker
Founder & CEO
Mint Innovation
The mining of virgin metal faces a growing number of economic and regulatory challenges. Biometallurgy provides a capital-efficient and environmentally benign method for recovering valuable metals from existing sources that are currently going to waste. Mint Innovation is developing biometallurgical processes that use microbes to capture value from metal waste streams while mitigating environmental harm. As Dr Will Barker will explain, the company’s aim is to create modular metal-recovery solutions that fit into the modern idea of a circular economy, thereby enabling better use of finite resources.
 

11:35 am

Wastewater treatment using e-waste
Professor Praveena Gangadharan
Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology Palakkad (IIT PKD)
Nowadays, electronic waste is the fastest-growing menace in the world. The management of e-waste is highly critical in developing countries due to improper collection and disposal practices. This presentation will give a brief of the prospect of recycling/reusing the e-waste by applying a concept of ‘utilizing one waste to treat another and recover energy’.
 

12:00 pm

Panel Discussion - Could international policy be doing more to address the global e-waste challenge?
Dr Rolph Payet
Executive Secretary
Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
Dr Katharina Kummer Peiry
Owner & Principal
Kummer EcoConsult
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
 
Lunch
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Closing the loop in the electronics sector
1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session moderated by
Elisabeth Smith
Executive Officer
Solving the E-waste Problem (StEP) Initiative

1:30 pm

Solving the E-Waste Problem (StEP) Initiative
Elisabeth Smith
Executive Officer
Solving the E-waste Problem (StEP) Initiative
The Solving the E-waste Problem (StEP) Initiative is an independent, multi-stakeholder platform for designing strategies that address all dimensions of electronics in an increasingly digitized world. StEP provides a global platform for sharing information, knowledge and recommendations, facilitates inclusive solutions-oriented members’ dialog and cooperation, works internationally to develop fair and objective policies and support the implementation of sustainable solutions and provides a scientific basis to change the awareness, knowledge, attitudes and behavior of the international business and consumer public. During this presentation, StEP’s ongoing activities will be presented by Elisabeth – for example, in terms of capacity building and addressing current issues for sustainable e-waste solutions. Further glimpses of members’ projects will also be provided.

1:55 pm

European Union WEEE Open Scope: one year on
Sabrina Zanin
Global Key Account Manager
Landbell Group
The so-called Open Scope, which WEEE Directive 2012/19/EU required member states to transpose by 15 August 2018, recently celebrated its first anniversary. The new way of defining and categorizing electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) brought new challenges for national authorities and producers. All EU member states are using the new definition of EEE although some apply different categories and enforcement dates. In practical terms, Open Scope brought more companies and products under the scope of the Directive and authorities needed to adjust their national registers. This presentation will provide an overview of national transpositions and observed practical challenges.

2:20 pm

Rethinking e-waste and new technology
Daniel Quelch
UK Sustainability & CSR Manager
Epson Europe
We understand climate change, sustainability and e-waste among others are a global societal problem. This is why, in 2017, Epson revised its Management Philosophy, adding the phrase ‘indispensable company’ to declare its commitment to use its technology to provide new customer value in order to play a central role in realizing a better world. Epson’s primary emphasis is on tackling the needs of customers and society, and on exceeding their expectations. Daniel’s presentation will look at how Epson is tackling some of the big e-waste issues, creating innovation to help waste and how it is seeking to create value that exceeds customers’ expectations by encouraging its people to draw on their strengths and take the initiative to identify and deliver products and services that will enrich lives and bring customers delight, happiness and greater convenience.
Break
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm

3:15 pm

The challenges of recycling lithium-ion batteries in North America
Carl E. Smith
CEO & President
Call2Recycle
Despite overwhelming alignment that lithium-ion batteries should be recycled, it remains extremely difficult to recycle them in North America. Safety constraints, nascent infrastructure and a dearth of a regulatory framework all conspire to restrain battery recycling. While there is good news on the horizon, there continues to be barriers to optimizing recycling and fulfilling the promise of a circular economy. Carl E. Smith heads Call2Recycle, Inc, North America’s premier consumer battery recycling organization that has recycled more than 160 million pounds of batteries since its inception. Carl will document these challenges and offer insights into what might be done to improve battery recycling in North America.

3:40 pm

Panel Discussion - International projects to enable sustainable e-waste management solutions
Elisabeth Smith
Executive Officer
Solving the E-waste Problem (StEP) Initiative
Eelco Smit
Senior Director Sustainability
Group Sustainability, Philips International
Heinz Böni
Head of Research Group Critical Materials and Resource Efficiency (CARE)
Empa - The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology
Daniel Hinchliffe
Advisor Circular Economy & Sustainable Waste Management
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
Morton Hemkhaus
Project Manager
adelphi
Conference Close

Green & Sustainable Electronics

Day1: November 14, 2019

Networking breakfast
8:15 am - 8:55 am
Green & Sustainable Electronics: keynote presentations
9:00 am - 12:15 pm

Session moderated by
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council
 

9:00 am

Circular economy business requirements
Eelco Smit
Senior Director Sustainability
Group Sustainability, Philips International
In 2016, Philips launched its sustainability program ‘Healthy People Sustainable Planet’ and set the ambitious target to generate 15% of its total revenue from circular propositions by 2020. In order to achieve this target, Philips not only defined to what extent existing revenues met circular criteria, but also defined what steps would be required to improve the performance in the years to come. Additionally, the company embarked on a broader journey of business transformation and capability building to sustain future growth after 2020. This presentation will explain how the concept of circular economy is being translated by Philips into actionable circular revenues and business requirements.
 

9:25 am

iNEMI's Value Recovery Project demonstrates a circular economy for hard disk drives
Dr Carol Handwerker
Professor of Materials Engineering and Environmental and Ecological Engineering
Purdue University
Peter Afiuny
Executive Vice President
Urban Mining Company
Urban Mining Company logo
The International Electronics Manufacturing Initiative (iNEMI) Project on Value Recovery from Used Electronics demonstrated the multiple pathways needed for development of a multi-stakeholder circular economy (CE) for hard disk drives (HDDs). iNEMI brought together a team of individuals and organizations who not only represented the full supply chain for value recovery for HDDs, but also the commitment and the wide range of expertise and creative thinking needed to address this multi-dimensional challenge of value recovery from HDDs. The specific stakeholders that participated in the Phase 2 project included Ames Laboratory, Cascade Asset Management, Cisco, Critical Materials Institute, Echo Environmental, Geodis, Google, Idaho National Laboratory, Microsoft, Momentum Technologies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, Rifer Environmental/Green Electronics Council, Seagate Technology, Teleplan, University of Arizona, and Urban Mining Company. This presentation given by Carol and Peter will describe the in-kind funded project, the CE pathways demonstrated and the Ostrom framework used for organizing a self-managing, sustainable system.
 

9:50 am

Lexmark's innovations for circular economy and durability
Sylvie Thomas
EMEA Head of CSR & Environmental Affairs
Lexmark
Lexmark is developing products to transform the way its customers consume goods. The company actively participates in a circular economy by designing products that stay in use longer, incorporate recycled materials and protect natural resources by reducing waste. As a leading re-manufacturer of printer cartridges, Lexmark understands that the adoption of circular economy principles promotes innovation and economic growth in a more environmentally sustainable manner.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Circular economy strategies in EEE
David Rochat
CEO
Sofies International
The circular economy model has become highly relevant in recent years, with the electronics industry being one of the sectors at the forefront of its application. In his presentation, Sofies’ CEO, David Sochat, will evaluate the current technical and economic situation of cell phone e-waste generated in France by surveying and analyzing the main actors that influence the management of this waste. After characterizing the remanufacturing and recycling CE loops, he will draw some conclusions as to the potential for improvement and why advancing towards a CE model is significant.
 

11:10 am

Circular economy in E&E industries
Christian Eckert
Head of Environmental Policy Department, ZVEI
Managing Director, ZVEI Batteries Division
A market-oriented approach that leaves room for innovation and fair competition is key to the development of a circular economy. The circa 1,600 member companies of the ZVEI – German Electrical and Electronic manufacturers’ Association continue their efforts and see great opportunities in being part of a solution to a circular economy. Many companies are already offering innovative, energy- and resource-saving products and services. A task of the association is to moderate processes that find a balance between future regulation and the capability of manufacturers to offer products and solutions that are sustainable and competitive on international markets. The presentation will give an insight into current priorities of the sector.
 

11:35 am

Panel Discussion: Sustainable photovoltaic systems (PV modules and inverters)
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council
Tom Rommens
R&D Manager, Unit Sustainable Materials Management
VITO & CIRCUSOL Coordinator
Andreas Wade
Global Sustainability Director
First Solar
Jan Clyncke
Managing Director
PV Cycle
Davide Polverini
Policy Officer, DG Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SME -- Clean Technologies and Products
European Commission
 
Lunch
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm
Enabling a paradigm shift in electronics materials
1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session moderated by
Professor David Peck
Associate Professor
Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)

1:30 pm

Wood-based electronic building blocks
Karl Håkansson
Senior Research Associate
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden
At the research institute RISE, experts are exploring how materials from the forest can be used in electronics applications. The primary objective is to create new functionality or added value, always with the bonus of working with renewable materials. Its core platforms are the activation of paper, films, filaments, aerogels and hydrogels, in combination with understanding the cyclability of its materials. RISE believes that the forest, as a renewable resource, has a role to play in the future of sustainable electronics.

1:55 pm

Printed Electronics on paper as a solution to reduce e-waste
Dr Gaël Depres
Exploratory & Partnership Manager
Guarro Casas, a subsidiary of Arjowiggins Creative Papers
The European ‘Innpaper’ project has the objective to replace old PCB or even electronics on plastic by using printed electronics on multifunctionalized paper. Devices such as smart labels to point-of-care bioplatforms are under development using multi-site pilot lines. Evaluation of recyclability and Life Cycle Analysis are ongoing to prove the environmental benefits of such processes and products, which could lead to a possible solution to reduce the e-waste generated by traditional electronics.

2:20 pm

A first in electronics materials: fully circular bromine-free flame-retardant PC/ABS
Wolfgang Ganser
General Manager
MGG Polymers
MGG Polymers has developed the world’s first bromine-free flame-retardant polymer that is fully circular and recyclable by MGG Polymers’ proprietary technology. While some plastics can already be recycled relatively easily and profitably, other fractions have to be disposed of. PC/ABS (polycarbonate/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) used to be one of the plastics that had to be discarded since, until now, there hadn’t been any known separation processes or experiences with the separation of this particular polymer. Wolfgang Ganser, MGG Polymers’ managing director, will discuss the company’s success story with this development, which has been six years in the making. The separation efficiency has been an outstanding 95% – and this is to be increased even further if possible.

2:45 pm

Life-cycle thinking in product design: the case of post-consumer WEEE plastics
Anton Berwald
Project Manager
Fraunhofer IZM
More than 80% of a product’s environmental impact is determined at the design stage. For a product to be properly recycled at its end of life, it is therefore key that the initial product design matches the recyclers’ requirements. This presentation shows results from the Horizon 2020 PolyCE (Post-Consumer High-tech Recycled Polymers for a Circular Economy) project, highlighting information asymmetries between recyclers and designers. It identifies major challenges on both sides and provides recommendations on how the consideration of life-cycle thinking during the design phase can benefit both recyclers and manufacturers.
Break
3:10 pm - 3:40 pm

3:35 pm

Soluboard: the recyclable PCB substrate
Jack Herring
CEO & Founder
Jiva Materials
Dr Jonathan Swanston
CTO
Jiva Materials
JIVA has developed ‘Soluboard’ – a patented, competitively priced and fully recyclable PCB substrate to rival the industry standard. Around 18 billion square meters of PCBs are manufactured every year and the rising value of precious metals within PCBs means that efficient recycling is a necessity. Waste PCBs are currently processed by shredding and incinerating them to extract the precious metals within. This is a very inefficient process with substantial loss of these metals during reprocessing. JIVA will use Soluboard as a catalyst to rethink the way that we are handling the fastest-growing waste stream in the world.

4:00 pm

An overview about biobased flame retardants
Rodolphe Sonnier
Lecturer in C2MA (Centre of Materials)
IMT Mines Alès France
The presentation deals with the development of bio-based flame retardants for polymers. The different families of biomolecules (polysaccharides, phenols, etc) will be listed with their main features in relation to flammability. Various examples, especially for epoxy resins, will be presented concerning the three main flame retardancy strategies: namely reactive, additive and coating strategies. The main approach is currently to functionalize biomolecules with phosphorus groups to prepare halogen-free flame retardants.

4:25 pm

A roadmap for flexible and green electronics: introducing protein‐based electronics components
Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz
Associate Professor
Technical University of Denmark
A research group led by Professor Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz at the Technical University of Denmark is developing a new class of thin-film electronics called ‘fleco-ionics’, the goal of which is to find green alternatives to reduce the explosively growing amount of e-waste. The team is using cocoons, woven by silkworms, to extract silk – one of the strongest materials in nature. It is cheap, readily available and biodegradable. In addition, it is an ionic conductor. This presentation will focus on Alireza’s application of a small motion sensor, which does not contain harmful synthetic materials. The production process is extremely simple, with the two components merely being mixed in water. Therefore, this product is incredibly easy to upscale. What’s more, it can be recycled again and again and maintains its high electrical sensitivity even after 2,000 bending cycles.

4:50 pm

Panel Discussion - What commercial opportunities can circular economy-based disciplines bring to product producers and recovery for re-use 'infrastructure' service providers?
Mike Higgins
Founder & Chief Spokesperson
Circularwise
Dr Colin Fitzpatrick
Senior Lecturer, Department of Electronic & Computer Engineering
University of Limerick
Sean Sheehan
CEO
Wisetek
Martin Langer
Executive Vice President Business Unit Industrial BioSolutions
BRAIN AG
Karl Edsjö
Director, Environmental & EU Affairs
Electrolux
Drinks Reception
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Day2: November 15, 2019

Re-imagining electronics end-of-life: in practice and in theory
9:00 am - 12:30 pm

Session moderated by
Mike Higgins
Founder & Chief Spokesperson
Circularwise
 

9:00 am

Inclusive business model for a waste-free telecom industry
Reinhardt Smit
Director - Supply Chains
Closing The Loop
Amsterdam-based social enterprise ‘Closing the Loop’ believes cell phones can become waste-free. But with two billion phones being produced each year and just a few percent being recycled in emerging markets, that can be challenging. Closing the Loop has spent the past five years building two things: an African scrap-collection network and a business model that can fuel proper, safe and corruption-free e-waste management. The company’s founder, Joost de Kluijver, will reveal to delegates how Closing the Loop managed to bring Samsung, T-Mobile and many others on board towards ‘circularity for phones’.
 

9:25 am

How modularity unlocks urban mining, reverse logistics and after sales in remote areas: an update on the PuzzleCompatible open-standard progress
Alejandro Santacreu
Inventor of the PuzzlePhone
Founder, Circular Devices Oy
This presentation will introduce the missing link to enable efficient re-use and customization of more standardized electronic devices. Modularity has been identified as a prerequisite to achieve a more circular economy in electronics. In particular, it would help to match re-usable modules and subassemblies during re-use and repair efforts to keep functional units in active use. Concentrating on those, which caused the highest environmental impact during the initial production? An ecosystem of compatible modules would also enable smaller production runs and smaller companies to participate in constantly updated electronic functionalities while concentrating on their unique customized parts of the product (or on software apps and services, as may be the focus of the company).
 

9:50 am

R2v3: the global standard for certified electronics re-use and recycling
Corey Dehmey
Executive Director
SERI - Sustainable Electronics Recycling International
R2 is the leading electronics re-use and recycling standard in the world with nearly 900 R2 Certified facilities in more than 30 countries. The growth and adoption of R2 Certification worldwide demonstrates its success in setting the bar for sustainable practices and supplementing the laws and regulations across many different regions of the world. The next version of the R2 Standard is being finalized with implementation beginning in 2020. This presentation will introduce the new structure of the R2v3 Standard and highlight the key changes that are expected to be included in the final version.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Zeroing out e-waste by adopting reuse
Steve Haskew
Strategic Commercial Manager
Circular Computing
If zeroing out e-waste is the first part of the sustainability loop – and process is the next step – then re-use is the defining part that closes the loop. Materials re-use has to be an acceptable part of a procurement strategy. Is it possible to change buyer behavior toward re-use and how does re-manufacturing help achieve this?
 

11:10 am

How the introduction of sustainable materials can improve your business case
Karl Edsjö
Director, Environmental & EU Affairs
Electrolux
Within the circular economy, Electrolux is exploring a number of different areas with a primary focus on the use of secondary raw materials. Since the launch of the ‘Green Range’ vacuum cleaners in 2010, the company has continued to expand its use of recycled plastic and has successfully introduced it in a number of applications. Now the company is also looking into other areas of circular solutions with connected appliances, alternative business models and closer cooperation with third parties along the value chain.
 

11:35 am

Sensor-based sorting technology and how it can help reduce flame-retardant content in WEEE plastics
Judit Jansana Borrajo
Head of TOMRA Sorting Iberia
TOMRA Sorting S.L.
European legislation demands for the recycling of end-of-life electronic equipment. At the same time, strict thresholds for recycled materials are in place for hazardous materials and hazardous elements. Recently, flame-retardant plastics – very much prominent in consumer electronics goods – has once more come into focus, with the reduction of bromine content caused by flame retardants especially necessary. Sensor-based sorting, following the detection principle of x-ray transmission, can offer a solution. This technology can detect materials with different atomic densities, thereby removing bromated plastics. Results achieved by this technology will be presented at the E-Waste World Conference & Expo in Frankfurt. Additionally, sensor-based technologies can be used to sort and recover many valuable materials from electronic scrap such as different metals and printed circuit boards.
 

12:00 pm

Product design impacts on the circular economy
Corey Dehmey
Executive Director
SERI - Sustainable Electronics Recycling International
Sean Magann
Vice President, Global Sales & Marketing
Sims Recycling Solutions
Martin Series
Director Sourcing
Global Resale
 
Lunch
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Advancing circularity in the world of electronics
1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session moderated by
Steve Haskew
Strategic Commercial Manager
Circular Computing

1:30 pm

New business models for circularity
Suzanne Kuiper
Senior Consultant | RC Sustainability
KPMG NL
Arnoud Walrecht
Director
KPMG NL
The transition from a linear ‘make-take-waste’ economy towards a circular economy is not only a transition in the way we consume, collect and process our material flows, it also requires a change in the way we organize our business and design our business models. During an interactive presentation, KPMG will discuss the challenges and opportunities for circular business models (such as product-as-a-service, buy-back contracts, sharing platforms and refurbishment) to enhance and capture economic value while limiting and avoiding e-waste. Questions around financial or fiscal incentives that support the transition will also be dealt with.

1:55 pm

Designing consumer electronics products for the circular economy
Dr Sebastian Hauptmann
Executive Vice President Operations & Digital Innovation
Sky Deutschland
When pay-TV broadcaster Sky Deutschland set out five years ago to develop a new 4k set-top box, its foremost goals were to provide customers with cutting-edge capabilities and to achieve improvements in operational efficiency and environmental performance. Those goals led the company to engineer the new device, known as Sky+ Pro, for durability, re-use and easy upgrades with a circular design, reflecting the idea of the circular economy. It complemented those qualities with a sleek, user-friendly look that won a Red Dot Award for product design, the German Design award and several other accolades. Dr Sebastian Hauptmann will explain the motives and the strategies pursued as well as the impact achieved.

2:20 pm

Implementation challenges for circular economy business models
Dr Richard Peagam
Associate Director, Global Producer Responsibility
Anthesis Group
Technology businesses are growing and diversifying at an unprecedented rate. A circular economy that is based on closing material loops and innovative business models is challenged by supply chain visibility, scale and multinational complexity, speed of innovation, macroeconomic trends and technical limitations. As technology proliferates and becomes more pervasive in society, managing end-of-life electronics in the traditional way becomes more difficult. This presentation highlights challenges and solutions for a more circular economy for electronics in a changing world.
Break
2:45 pm - 3:10 pm

3:10 pm

Material constraints and critical materials: circular pathways for E-waste
Professor David Peck
Associate Professor
Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)
The demand and supply of a range of technology materials for the production of EEE products continues to grow. The lifespan and technology pace of the sector results in corresponding increases in e-waste. Efforts to develop technologies to mitigate climate change also require increased EEE technologies. The combination of risks of insecurity of supply together with economic importance has led to a range of technology materials being defined as ‘critical materials’. This presentation will explore these fields and present pathways forward that could mitigate negative impacts over the coming decades.

3:35 pm

From now to next: how the combinatorial power of emerging technologies enable circularity
Laura Rheinbay
Sustainability Strategy Consultant
Accenture Strategy
Alexander Holst
Managing Director
Accenture Strategy
Accenture’s Laura Rheinbay and Alexander Holst will look at how fourth industrial revolution technologies are used today, and what could be possible in the near future to envision a new way of managing our resources and tackling e-waste. They will show how different solutions along the value chain can be applied to accelerate the circular transition, addressing challenges of opaque value chains, linear product design and lock-in, inefficient collection and reverse logistics, as well as insufficient sorting and pre-processing. These technologies range from digital datasets linked to physical products using a product passport and the ‘Internet of Materials’; artificial intelligence-based design tools; and blockchain-based reward schemes to hyper intelligent sorting and disassembly supported by machine vision and robotics.

4:00 pm

Panel Discussion - The Circular Procurement Guide: the opportunities and challenges involving ‘buying’ circular
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council
Andy Cosgrove
Manager, Regulatory Compliance & Environmental Affairs
Xerox
Marcel Jacobs
Founder
Circl8
Michiel van der Ros
Director Business Development EMEA
Flex
There is an increasing emphasis on large-scale purchasers, both public and private sector, supporting circular economy yet there is minimal guidance on how circularity translates into specific procurement requirements and approaches. This panel discussion will give an overview of existing circularity procurement guidance from the EU and relevant examples. This session is linked to the Green Electronics Council-sponsored Sustainable Circular Procurement workshop scheduled to take place at the Kap Europa on 13 November.
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Electric Vehicles & Battery Recycling

Day1: November 14, 2019

Networking breakfast
8:15 am - 8:55 am
Electric Vehicles & Battery Recycling: keynote presentations
9:00 am - 12:30 pm

Session moderated by
Hans-Eric Melin
Founder
Circular Energy Storage
 

9:00 am

The EV battery – the key to a circular industry
Hans-Eric Melin
Founder
Circular Energy Storage
The battery is by far the most expensive and valuable component in an electric vehicle. It also typically has a longer lifespan than the vehicle itself. These factors change everything for the automotive industry – from sourcing of components to end-of-life strategy. Just like any big change, this brings both challenges and opportunities – but it also creates a completely new landscape of players and activities with consequences not only for the car companies but as much for car dealers, workshops, energy providers, battery manufacturers, recyclers and waste collectors. The only thing that is certain is that the automotive industry will need to be more circular than ever before and maybe more than any other industry.
 

9:25 am

Challenges for a new EU regulatory framework for EV batteries
José Rizo
Senior Expert
European Commission
The European Union needs an ambitious regulatory framework to guarantee the sustainability of batteries - i.e. to minimize their environmental impact, lower carbon emissions and ensure efficient use of resources - while, at the same time, support the growth of a high-performing, safe and sustainable battery industry that covers their entire life-cycle. The results of the evaluation of the Batteries Directive, the only piece of EU legislation entirely dedicated to batteries, indicate that the current system does not appear to be suitable for dealing with them. There are no detailed end-of-life provisions for these batteries: no collection targets, no specific recycling efficiencies for lithium batteries. Likewise, there are no 'design and use' requirements for EV batteries that would make recycling easier or ensure better use of resources. Finally, no waste-avoidance provisions are defined by the current regulatory framework on batteries. The Commission is therefore exploring possible measures to address the shortcomings of the current legal framework, including the assessment of social, economic and environmental impacts of possible modifications in relevant legal texts. José will present a summary of the most recent developments in this context, pointing out pressing problems and showing how the European Commission is exploring possible solutions.
 

9:50 am

The potential and benefits of second-life EV batteries
Jean-Denis Curt
Strategic Environmental Planning
Renault Group
The widespread deployment of Electric Vehicles offers an unequalled solution to massively reduce CO2 and polluting emissions from road transport, but also represents a great opportunity to accelerate the transition towards a 100% renewable energy system: EV batteries are designed, tested and manufactured under such stringent standards that even after 10 years or more on a vehicle they meet the requirements of most stationary storage applications as well as numerous mobile applications at a very competitive cost, thus bringing a significant additional contribution to the low-carbon transition of the Energy and Transport sectors. Jean-Denis CURT will explore and illustrate this potential through the prism of Renault’s experience and latest projects.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Revolt: the technologies paving the way for li-ion battery recycling
Emma Nehrenheim
Chief Environmental Officer
Northvolt
Recycling can be challenging and especially so in the case of recycling EV batteries – complex systems containing numerous valuable elements and materials. If done without care, recycling methods also have the potential to be more harmful for the environment than raw material extraction. Here, Northvolt’s Emma Nehrenheim explains how the Swedish innovator is establishing solutions by refining recycling technologies and supporting effective market conditions for battery recycling in Europe.
 

11:10 am

Closing the battery loop: why recycling is crucial to secure a sustainable metals supply
Dr. Christian Hagelüken
Director EU Government Affairs
Umicore AG & Co KG
Electromobility will boost the demand for battery metals such as cobalt, nickel and lithium, hence their reliable, responsibly sourced supply will become a decisive factor. Establishing effective take-back and recycling systems is crucial as it complements primary supply, reduces the dependency on certain mining countries, and contributes significantly to mitigate the environmental footprint of electromobility. Although high-quality recycling technologies are available, collection rates often are insufficient and end-of-life products are bypassing these installations. A main challenge is to generate drivers for comprehensive metals recycling, which requires fundamental changes in the way we design, sell, use and recycle our products.
 

11:35 am

Closing the loop of electromobility – challenges and opportunities
Rasmus Bergström
CEO
Stena Technoworld
With the value chain and ownership structure, how can we secure collection and recycling of electric vehicle batteries in a sustainable, cost-efficient and environmental way?
 

12:00 pm

The Faraday Institution’s ‘ReLiB’ project - recycling methods for the recovery of critical materials from automotive batteries
Gavin Harper
Faraday Institution Research Fellow
University of Birmingham
As the number of electric vehicles on our roads grows, lithium-ion batteries will present both a waste management problem and also an opportunity to secure resources for future battery production. This presentation examines recycling methods for the recovery of Critical Materials from automotive batteries based on the work of the Faraday Institution’s ‘ReLiB’ project, focusing on the 'Recycling and Reuse of Lithium Ion Batteries' featuring work within the Birmingham Centre for Strategic Elements & Critical Materials to use robotics and automation to liberate critical materials.
 
Lunch
12:25 pm - 1:30 pm
Endangered elements: critical materials in the circular economy
1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session moderated by
Dr. Christian Hagelüken
Director EU Government Affairs
Umicore AG & Co KG

1:30 pm

Where it all begins: the critical role of mining in the EV supply chain
Mark Saxon
Director/Interim President & CEO
Leading Edge Materials
The transition to low-carbon energy generation and storage is creating unprecedented demand for critical raw materials. Secure access to new high-function materials will be a key determinant of the speed, cost and success of the energy transition. Supply chain security and transparency will become a differentiator for successful battery and automotive industry players. The high growth forecast for electric vehicle uptake is creating exceptional opportunities for the mining industry, while highlighting the supply chain bottlenecks for ethically sourced raw materials. Long-term underinvestment in European exploration and mining, a first-mover advantage by Asian industry, and the long lead time for mine development is creating a very competitive landscape for raw material access.

1:55 pm

Hot-spot batteries: how improved battery reporting supports the closing of material loops in Europe
Johanna Emmerich
Research Fellow
Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin)
This presentation will look at the first EU-wide and open-access Urban Mine Platform (UMP), which was launched in 2018 by the consortium of the ProSUM project. The web portal constitutes a unique data collection on the amounts of batteries placed on the market, the stocks in use, the product compositions and the waste flows, as well as on the resources they contain. This information is valuable to a number of industry stakeholders but also policy-makers and academia in an effort to close materials loops, for instance for strategic metals inherent in batteries. Challenges for maintaining an improved knowledge base relate to the improvement of data collection practices and will be tackled in this presentation together with a proposal on improved battery classifications.

2:20 pm

How development of the battery recycling market can ease the resource constraints for critical metals
Asad Farid
Associate Director - Thematics Team
Berenberg
This presentation will focus on how enhanced battery recycling can potentially ease the predicted tightening on supply of certain critical metals. Among questions that will be answered, how much will battery waste increase over the next five years? What recycling technologies will be used for EV batteries? Can second-life use of EV batteries as stationary storage systems postpone the emergence of the battery recycling market? What level of investment will be required to meet the demand for battery recycling? And finally, Asad Farid will also provide an update on the recycling plans announced so far globally.

2:45 pm

Opportunities in minerals and advanced materials that are essential for a sustainable future
Jeremy Mcmanus
General Manager
Neometals
The scale of predicted global ‘electrification’ will require minerals and advanced materials in quantities that are not presently available. With the tipping point for wide-scale electric vehicle adoption thought to be nearing, traditional extraction of mineral resources as battery feed-stocks will be put under extraordinary pressure. Material supply certainty and domestic sovereignty issues over technology minerals makes the re-use of ‘urban’ sourced battery feed materials compelling. Add to this regulatory recycling obligations, stakeholder sustainability pressure, fire safety and the significant financial incentive, and the decision process becomes simple for those placing lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) on the market. Neometals has developed a unique and robust process for the sustainable recovery of valuable constituents from scrap and end-of-life LIBs. The Neometals processing flowsheet targets the recovery of >90% of all battery materials from LIBs that might otherwise be disposed of in landfill or processed in energy-intensive pyrometallurgical recovery circuits.
Break
3:10 pm - 3:40 pm

3:40 pm

Cooperation in supply chain and circular projects
Nathan Williams
Chief Executive Officer
Minespider
For early blockchain pilots, it is essential to establish cooperation between supply chain participants. But how much data can be shared without running into trouble with anti-trust issues? And how can we move from groups of engaged participants to a general purpose infrastructure for any company to join for full traceability? In this presentation, Minespider’s Nathan Williams will look at these challenges and ways to address them.

4:05 pm

The importance of sustainable lithium for the development of electric cars
Vincent Ledoux-Pedailles
Vice President Business Development
Infinity Lithium Corporation
There is a fantastic momentum around the development of electric vehicles across the world and Europe is investing billions of Euros to transform its auto industry and become a leader in electrified mobility. The continent is also starting to welcome large investments for lithium-ion battery factories but further upstream, in lithium mining and refining, Europe is lagging behind. Infinity Lithium and its San Jose project in Extremadura, Spain, represents a strategic investment supporting the development of a more integrated, sustainable and regionalized lithium-ion battery and auto industry.

4:30 am

Transforming raw materials supply chains using blockchain
Douglas Johnson-Poensgen
Founder & CEO
Circulor
Circulor’s blockchain solution for electric vehicle production – which tracks components from mine to finished product, enabling manufacturers to prove ethical and sustainable sourcing – will ultimately benefit both consumers and the environment. Here, Doug Johnson-Poensgen will explain how his company’s solution has the potential to transform complex industrial supply chains both by assuring provenance and improving efficiency.

4:55 pm

Panel Discussion - Building a sustainable European EV battery materials supply chain
Hans-Eric Melin
Founder
Circular Energy Storage
Emma Nehrenheim
Chief Environmental Officer
Northvolt
Mark Saxon
Director/Interim President & CEO
Leading Edge Materials
Dr. Christian Hagelüken
Director EU Government Affairs
Umicore AG & Co KG
Drinks Reception
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Day2: November 15, 2019

Recycling, recovery, re-use and life-cycle management
9:00 am - 12:15 pm

Session moderated by
Johanna Emmerich
Research Fellow
Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin)
 

9:00 am

The criticality for a circular economy – re-use and recycling for lithium-ion batteries
Christian Winkler
Managing Director
TES-AMM Central Europe
In view of an exponential growth of waste around the globe, the need for a functioning circular economy is also increasing at the same rate. While it has long been clear for WEEE that there are massive deficits in collection and treatment today, although high-quality take-back and recycling solutions are available. A similar problem is now emerging for lithium-ion batteries. Therefore it is important to create the right conditions to minimize the environmental impact of lithium-ion batteries. Against this background, end-of-life-services for lithium-ion batteries should not only focus on the recovery of metals such as cobalt and lithium, but also include re-use and energy harvesting. An intelligent combination of the different elements helps to conserve resources and opens up new business areas on the way to increased sustainability.
 

9:25 am

Technical and regulatory challenges in international take-back operations for industrial li-ion batteries
Wassilij Weber
Head of Operations
SIMPLi RETURN - A Joint Venture By Interseroh & Saubermacher
Industrial lithium-ion batteries are becoming increasingly more common in numerous applications, among which electric vehicles are just one popular example. They often weigh hundreds of kilograms and sooner or later every battery placed in the market must be returned and recycled. Since li-ion batteries present a potential hazard, multiple regulatory fields must be considered: e.g. Dangerous Goods Regulations, Waste Regulations, and many more. Especially when it comes to exporting waste batteries for recycling, logistics face even more challenges. Experts from SIMPLi RETURN provide insights from their daily routine and show how large industrial li-ion batteries are processed internationally.
 

9:50 am

Circunomics: Big Data-based monitoring, recycling and second-life trading of batteries
Patrick Peter
CEO & Founder
Circunomics
By 2025, 11 million tons of batteries will be available for the recycling and second-life market. The battery economy is confronted with serious challenges to make value chains fit for the future. Can Big Data and deep learning help to maximize the efficiency of the circular battery economy? Being the first Big Data-based marketplace for battery monitoring, recycling and trading, Circunomics enables industry partners to make integrated battery management a key capability. With its life-cycle and pricing algorithms, and standardized data interfaces, Circunomics connects industry partners across all stages of the battery supply chain to maximize the resale value of batteries and to reduce recycling costs.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Why the circular economy must link up the whole supply chain
Dr Will Ritzrau
Director of Sustainability
SAP
Can a circular supply chain be more efficient and effective despite the costs of recovering, re-manufacturing, re-using or recycling materials? Resource scarcity, trade wars, public pressure and stricter regulations require a business transformation toward resource-centered value maintenance in endless use cycles. Existing company silo optimization needs to evolve toward trustful collaboration across industry partners along assembly and disassembly flows of products and precious resources. Only data-driven transparency of material and financial flows will allow this required shift in mindset to secure long-term economic viability within the planetary boundaries.
 

11:10 am

4R life-cycle management for xEV battery packs
Gert-Jan van der Have
Managing Director
Spiers New Technologies BV (SNT)
Spiers New Technologies (SNT) is a global OEM service provider in grading and life-cycle management of used xEV battery packs. SNT’s proprietary testing algorithms enable applications such as remanufacturing and repurposing. In this presentation, SNT’s Gert-Jan van der Have will share his experience as a Tier 1 automotive service provider and present both opportunities and challenges in the world of used xEV battery packs.
 

11:35 am

Panel Discussion - Responsible sourcing in electric vehicle battery supply chains
Douglas Johnson-Poensgen
Founder & CEO
Circulor
Vincent Ledoux-Pedailles
Vice President Business Development
Infinity Lithium Corporation
Nathan Williams
Chief Executive Officer
Minespider
Kunal Phalpher
Chief Commercial Officer
Li-Cycle
 
Lunch
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm
The after life of lithium-ion batteries
1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

1:30 pm

A second-life for EV batteries: the newest value pool in energy storage
Eric Hannon
Partner, Frankfurt
McKinsey & Company
With continued global growth of EVs, a new opportunity for the power sector is emerging: stationary storage powered by used EV batteries, which could exceed 200GWh by 2030. After remanufacturing, such batteries are still able to perform sufficiently to serve less-demanding applications. Three applications are most suitable for second-life EV batteries: 1) Providing reserve energy capacity to maintain a utility’s power reliability; 2) Helping defer transmission and distribution investments; and 3) Taking advantage of power arbitrage opportunities by storing renewable power for use during periods of scarcity.

1:55 pm

Creating a secondary source for critical battery materials
Kunal Phalpher
Chief Commercial Officer
Li-Cycle
Li-ion batteries play an essential role in the global transition toward electrification, renewable energy and increased mobile communication. To meet this rapidly growing demand, the world needs improved technology and supply chain innovations for critical and scarce battery-grade materials in these batteries. The world has, however, lacked a viable option for leveraging the rapidly growing volumes of spent Li-ion batteries as a source for these materials. Kunal will discuss the currently available processes, including Li-Cycle’s innovative and sustainable resource recovery process.

2:20 pm

Presentation title to be announced
Dirk Kaiser
Segment Leader Distributed Energy
Eaton
Break
2:45 pm - 3:10 pm

3:10 pm

From grave to cradle: an EV’s end-of-life journey
Sam Haig
Battery Recycling Business Manager
R S Bruce Metals & Machinery
The vehicle recycling sector is on the cusp of a boom in EVs and hybrid vehicles as those sold over the past decade begin to reach end of life in significant numbers. How will metal recyclers, long used to traditional IC engine vehicles, handle their encounters with these new types of electric and hybrid vehicles? How do battery recyclers accommodate batteries hundreds of times the size, weight and voltage of those from laptops and cell phones? And how does the ‘second life’ question fit into the equation? Sam will take you on the journey of an EV battery as it reaches end of life, highlighting the practicalities that will be faced at each stage, from safe depollution and dismantling to evaluation for re-manufacturing, and finally to effective and economical material recycling.

3:35 pm

EV batteries – a second life before the afterlife
Matthew Lumsden
CEO
Connected Energy
Working with organizations such as Renault, Jaguar Land Rover and Nissan, Connected Energy is a world leader in utilizing second-life electric vehicle battery packs in stationary energy storage systems – a redeployment that doubles the working lives of the batteries. Matthew Lumsden will discuss some of the work of Connected Energy and describe some of its projects and the challenges/opportunities associated with second-life battery use.

4:00 pm

Panel Discussion: Second-life of EV Batteries
Matthew Lumsden
CEO
Connected Energy
Rohit Bhagat
Professor
Coventry University
Athan Fox
Chief Technology & Innovation Officer
Aurelius Environmental
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