2021 Conference Agenda

E-Waste Challenges & Opportunities

Green & Sustainable Electronics

Electric Vehicles & Battery Recycling

E-Waste Challenges & Opportunities

Day1: November 30, 2021

Opening Plenary & Keynote Sessions
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Latest insights on the global overview of e-waste statistics, management, legislation and outlook to 2050.
Kees Baldé
Senior Programme Officer at the Sustainable Cycles Programme
United Nations University
It’s often stated that electronic waste is a fast growing waste stream currently peaking at 53.7 Mt per annum and less than 20% is recycled. But what will happen to it in future if nothing substantial changes, or if we undergo a circular economy transition? How does the COVID pandemic impact? What are the regional challenges and opportunities? The presentation will touch upon the latest insights and facts of global e-waste flows, management, legislation and provide an outlook what’s needed to meet the UN Sustainable Development Goal targets for sustainable consumption and production for electronic waste. It will zoom into various regions, looks into the future, and discuss the economic opportunities and the boundary conditions to manage e-waste.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Future perspectives on global transboundary movement in e-waste
Dr Rolph Payet
Executive Secretary
Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
With the advent of information technology and the Internet of Things, the increase in e-waste at the global level reached 50 million metric tons in 2018 and if nothing is done it is expected to reach 120 tons annually by 2050, with only about 20% making it to proper recycling facilities. Concomitantly, the export of e-waste, legal or illegally, to countries with little or no facilities for its recycling is leading to increased human exposure and the release of toxic chemicals into the environment. The presentation will focus on emerging issues and information with regards to transboundary movement of e-waste.
 

9:50 am (CET)

An enhanced vision of EPR and the role of all actors
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
The WEEE Forum, a prominent representative of Producer Responsibility Organisations (PROs) throughout the world, has developed a new vision which calls for an overhaul of the current system of extended producer responsibility, including targets, which it claims is not fit for purpose. Based on recent research undertaken by the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and against the background of very few EU Member States being able to meet the 2019 collection targets for WEEE despite enormous progress being made in tackling the increasing amount of e-waste generated, the WEEE Forum lays out four vital steps that need to be taken to ensure the system is fair and achievable. The first is what is termed as the #allactors approach: a policy model whereby all private and public entities that have access to WEEE and therefore are involved in the collection, logistics, preparation for reuse, refurbishment, treatment, or recycling of WEEE, or in the associated monitoring, legislative and enforcement activities, are subject to minimum legal obligations regarding, amongst other things, compliance with legislation, reporting to the competent authorities and, meeting official standards and communication. The #allactors Approach means all actors have legal obligations which competent authorities must enforce to ensure that all actors contribute in line with their requirements. This approach will result in more fairness and inclusivity in the market as well as enhanced monitoring based on sustained cooperation.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

11:10 am (CET)

Value Recovery Redefined When Retiring IT Equipment
Jelle Slenters
Head of Business Development EMEA - Global ITAD and Re-Use
Sims Lifecycle Services
The electronic recycling industry has evolved and matured since it emerged in the 1990s. Awareness is growing around corporate compliance and environmental sustainability. Organisations are working with industry-leaders to reimagine the equipment disposal landscape through the lens of sustainability. Today, the entire IT infrastructure ecosystem is evolving quickly. Changes in IT infrastructure, end user equipment and increased interest in asset reuse and closed loop recycling allow us to reimagine how we handle used IT equipment. These changes give us a unique opportunity to improve how we manage used electronics using data driven information to manage the lifecycle of IT assets. Designing and manufacturing durable and recyclable equipment will unlock previously unavailable sustainability gains. Until recently, financial returns and data destruction were primary outcomes of successful IT asset disposition (ITAD) and recycling programs. Today’s leading companies are seeking ways to measure the overall environmental impact of owning and using IT equipment, most often using carbon emissions, or greenhouse gas emissions, as the baseline measurement for environmental impact. This session will look back at the evolution of the recycling industry in the last 30 years and discuss reimagining IT Asset lifecycles and sustainability measurements in eWaste recycling programs. It will look at case study examples with companies who have built sustainability into their equipment disposal decision making processes, with demonstrable, measurable results and share recommendations on redefining what can be considered value recovery when retiring your IT assets.
 

11:35 am (CET)

To be announced
Imke Schmidt
Projektmanager
Collaborating Centre on Sustainable Consumption and Production (CSCP)
 

12:00 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion: Consumer Insight Action Panel – Circular Electronics: Insights into three pilots on consumer behaviour change
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum
Imke Schmidt
Projektmanager
Collaborating Centre on Sustainable Consumption and Production (CSCP)
CIAP is an European multistakeholder initiative, designed to support the transition to the circular economy by generating, applying and testing consumer behavioural insights in circular strategies for electronics. The goal is better understanding consumer behaviour related to electronics and engaging consumers in a meaningful way when it comes to fostering more circular behaviours. Our guiding question is: How might we innovate to enable people to reuse, repair, share, return, recycle or lease their devices? The topic is approached by a multistakeholder group that form the club and the most exciting part of the work is that we pilot and test real-life interventions and experiments on the ground to support more circular behaviours among consumers, in order to drive business innovation and inform the European Commission about relevant policy needs and strategies. In total, we conduct three pilots, two on online take back schemes of old smartphones and one on the French repairability index and customer response to it.
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
System-wide responses to tackling e-waste: circular from end to end
1:30 pm - 2:45 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

LCD Recycling, Industry 4.0 and Circular Economy
Dr Lisa Maria T. O'Donoghue
Founder & CEO
Votechnik
In a world, where electronic devices have become more important than ever, allowing us to keep connection during the pandemic, social distancing, and home working, we see trends of double monitor displays at the home office as well as at the work office accompanied by an increase in purchasing home entertainment devices. The seismic impact of this consumer behavior will be felt in the years to come. There is a need to depollute these displays of hazardous materials as well as recovery the value of the metal. While the current manual recycling processes are just about keeping up with the LCD volumes, the clock is ticking to the point where speed and cost will be too much. However, the requirements here are not simply that of technology but more importantly a business model that embraces circular economy. This is especially poignant when the back bone of the EU recycling sector are SME companies. The EC Project ALR4000 is tackling this dual challenge and will present the results of "where full automation & robotics with industrial 4.0 meets innovative circular economy business models".

1:55 pm (CET)

Electronics recycling – current and future challenges for end-processing (focus on precious and other critical metals).
Steven Art
Project & Supply Manager
Umicore Precious Metals Refining
E-waste end-processing (end-refining) has shown resilience to a change in material quality and availability since years. Smelting & refining operations, like Umicore PMR, treat e-waste blended with other materials in large scale installations. This leads to high recovery yields and this of a broad range of (critical) metals. It will continue to exist, possibly together with other, new end-processing technologies to tackle the e-waste challenge, ideally in synergy, rather than in competition. A future challenge will be the recycling of the other critical metals (EU critical metals & conflict minerals) with a lower economical value, in a sustainable way.

2:20 pm (CET)

Re-purposing working outdated electronics
Marco Petraroia
Company Director
MPIS Reloaded OU
A cloud-based advertising platform designed to re-purpose outdated smart TVs and other electronics.
Networking Session -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 
Financing the collection and recycling of e-waste
3:15 pm - 5:30 pm (CET)

3:15 pm (CET)

To be announced
Francois Gaudet
Head of Thematic Impact Finance Operations
European Investment Bank (EIB)

3:40 pm (CET)

Financing e-waste management in Nigeria
Reinhardt Smit
Director - Supply Chains
Closing The Loop

4:05 pm (CET)

From knowledge exchange to action – piloting treatment and financing solutions to e-waste management in low and middle income countries. Lessons learnt from PREVENT Projects
Daniel Hinchliffe
Advisor Sustainable Solid Waste Management and Circular Economy
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
The PREVENT Waste Alliance is a global multistakeholder initiative which exchanges on and develops solutions on pressing e-waste and plastic pollution problems. Following its launch in 2019, discussion and knowledge exchange has moved to action, as the members of the alliance now implement pilot projects in over 15 countries. This presentation shares insights from the pilot projects of the PREVENT e-waste working group, which aim to develop treatment and financing solutions to improve e-waste management in contexts where currently dangerous, toxic and polluting informal recycling dominates. These projects address needs both globally – such as connecting markets for off-takers to recyclers - and more locally on the ground, for example in Ecuador, Tanzania and Nigeria.

4:30 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion: Using pilots to drive systemic change – what does it take to scale long term treatment and financing solutions to e-waste management?
Daniel Hinchliffe
Advisor Sustainable Solid Waste Management and Circular Economy
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
Implementing activities on the ground through pilots brings more tangible results than desktop studies. But how do we move from the piloting stage to larger change on a societal level? What are the key factors? Bringing together different implementing organisations from the PREVENT Waste Alliance, this panel will discuss how implementation of pilots can move into broader approaches to support longer term change that supports wider sustainable e-waste management globally.

Day2: December 1, 2021

Global solutions to a global problem: international perspectives on e-waste
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Facilitating the environmentally sound transboundary movement of e-waste – an innovation challenge
Yuri Saito
Community Engagement Specialist - Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation
World Economic Forum
To bring fresh ideas to solve old problems, the Global Alliance for Trade facilitation together with its partners the Government of Rwanda and Enviroserve, is organising an innovation sprint – also known as hackathon - that brings creative minds from all over the world, knowledge from different disciplines, and field-experts in the world of e-waste together for 60 hours in a virtual environment to work on tangible solutions for better materials reprocessing and collection and transboundary movement of e-waste. We hope to present the results of this innovation sprint during the e-Waste World conference.
 

9:25 am (CET)

KEEP all materials, each component, every origin - learnings from the innovation project
Krisitna Liljestrand
Project leader, KEEP
Chalmers University of Technology
Electronics waste is increasing at a rapid pace. Fifty million metric tonnes of old electronics are discarded every year. KEEP aims to change this by creating a traceability solution for electrical and electronic products. KEEP has gathered 14 partners from the whole lifecycle to facilitate information sharing through a traceability solution that collects information about the product from all stages. This will help everyone involved to reduce waste, retain value and extend the life of products. At the presentation, Kristina Liljestrand can present the project from process to output and learnings from the collaboration. The project is based in Sweden and unique in its kind. Read more about the project here https://xd.adobe.com/view/432af1e2-42a2-4484-6ad4-802aa7ec41c9-351b/?fullscreen
 

9:50 am (CET)

Valuable materials recovery from waste printed circuit board at Remind (Recycling Materials for Indonesia)
Muhammad Dzikri Ahira Soefihara
Graduate Student
Delft University of Technology
Remind, “Recycling Materials for Indonesia”, is built to participate in solving e-waste management’s issue in Indonesia. We currently focus to recycle valuable materials from waste printed circuit boards. Collection, pre-treatment, metals recovery, and waste management are the main processes conducted at our pilot factory. We have demonstrated that this route is practically feasible and economically beneficial to recover metals, particularly gold. To improve the recovery, we recently added shaking table equipment to assist the pre-treatment process. Preliminary tests showed that this improvement contributed effectively to separate the high-valuable materials (gold concentrate) from less valuable materials (plastic).
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

System-wide responses to tackling e-waste: circular from end to end
Craig Campion
Director of ITAD Services
Stone Group
 

11:10 am (CET)

The handling of old electronics in private households and concepts for improvement
Alexander Suessmilch
Managing Shareholder
CIRECON
In German households 32 million tons of electrical waste is stored, resulted in an inquiry of the Bitkom 2018. The reason for that we found out with our survey. We asked over 500 end consumers what happens to their unused electronic equipment at home and why their readiness to dispose of old units is so low – this is shown by the low recycling rates of 45% in Germany. Our survey result show a clear trend into higher willingness to recycle if the right take-back concepts are presented by manufacturers, dealers and other companies obliged to collect and take back e-waste units.
 

11:35 am (CET)

Transitioning Africa into the Circular Economy
Malcolm Whitehouse
Business Development & Compliance Manager
AST Recycling
With Africa being a dumping ground for the modern world’s e-waste through deferred dumping, rather than being a problem, should be seen as an opportunity to create sustainable jobs, (especially post Covid 19) create value, and clean up the environment. Less than 0.9% of all e-waste generated in Africa is recycled formally, out of 2,9 million tons placed on market annually. Transitioning into a circular economy can be attained through collaborative partnerships, networking and sharing of skills and information across the continent.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: What role can and should the private sector take in reaching solutions for e-waste management in low and middle income countries
Reinhardt Smit
Director - Supply Chains
Closing The Loop
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
Mining e-waste: a vital source of secondary raw materials and key to unlocking the circular economy
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

Robotic recycling technologies – helping to grow the circular economy
Paudy O’Brien
Founder & CEO
FPD Recycling
Consumer electronics have changed a lot in 20 years – look how our TVs have gotten thinner and smarter. But if you look at their end-of-life phase - not much has changed. The E-waste industry is in urgent need of a safe and profitable process for handling and recycling screens, locally, in the country of origin. The same way automation has revolutionised electronics' manufacturing, it can change its end-of-life processing. Advanced robotic recycling technologies allow us to move away from the take-make-waste linear model to a circular economy. It is now time to start looking at the e-waste as a source of valuable materials, rather than harmful, toxic waste that is pushed around until it ends up in landfills around the globe.

1:55 pm (CET)

Automation as a vehicle for valuable recycling
Marco Guolo
CTO and Sales Manager
Osai

2:20 pm (CET)

Metallurgical E-waste Recycling as an Integral Part of the Circular Economy
Dr Stefan Konetschnik
Managing Director
UrbanGold GmbH
The presentation summarizes the possibilities of metallurgical processing of copper and precious metals containing fractions from e-waste. The first part of the presentation deals with the status of the metallurgical recycling industry using Europe as an example. The positioning of the metallurgy in the circular economy and the waste hierarchy are shown and discussed. Deficiencies of the established system are highlighted and possibilities to overcome them are offered. Furthermore, the technical and economic hurdles when setting up a metallurgical recycling facility are presented. Topic of the last part of the presentation, are the steps for planning, developing, and realizing a recycling project.
Networking Session -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 

3:15 pm (CET)

To be announced
Serge Kimbel
CEO
WeeeCycling

3:40 pm (CET)

Biomining – the future for low-CO2 recovery
Will Barker
Co-founder & CEO
Mint Innovation

4:05 pm (CET)

Sustainable, resource and energy efficient recycling of e-scrap
Andreas Nolte
Head Of Quality Management
Aurubis
Aurubis is processing more than 100,000 tonnes of e-scrap fractions annually. The multi-metal process ensures the recovery of up to 20 elements to commodities or intermediates for further extraction. Sustainable recycling means being fully compliant and committed to directives, laws, ordinances, responsible sourcing and standards. Energy efficient implies using best available technology and Aurubis smelter network to optimize energy demand and carbon footprint of metals extraction. Facts and figures will demonstrate today´s state of the art e-scrap recycling.

4:30 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion - Emerging E-Waste Issues
Elisabeth Smith
Executive Director
StEP Initiative - Solving The E-Waste Problem
Through a members survey conducted in 2019, StEP has identified three emerging e-waste issues: (1) Lack of Markets (2) Pervasive Electronics and (3) Off-Grid Energy Systems. A Working Group has been installed at StEP to identify the main challenges associated with those issues and further provide some recommendation on next steps. During the session the main findings of the Working Group will be presented and discussed.

Green & Sustainable Electronics

Day1: November 30, 2021

Keynote presentations
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Selling sustainability in electonics
Arnoud Walrecht
Director
KPMG
 

9:25 am (CET)

Advances towards circular economy policies in the EU
Davide Polverini
Policy Officer, DG Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SME -- Clean Technologies and Products
European Commission
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

To be announced
Sabrina Zanin
Global Key Account Manager
Landbell AG
 

11:10 am (CET)

Sustainable materials at Dell Technologies: closing the loop
Jonathan Perry
Global Product Compliance Engineering & Environmental Affairs
Dell Technologies
 

11:35 am (CET)

Strategies in product take-back and recovery
Marta Jakowczyk
Take Back and Recovery Ops Program Manager EMEA, Social and Environmental Responsibility
HP
 

12:00 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion - The Circular Electronics Partnership: implementing our 2030 roadmap
Carolien van Brunschot
Manager, Circular Economy & Secretariat CEP
WBCSB
According to the Global E-waste Monitor 2020, in one year, a staggering 50 million metric tonnes of e-waste are generated. Of this total amount, more than 40 million tonnes of e-waste are discarded in landfill, burned or illegally traded and treated in a sub-standard way every year. Under the current linear economy conditions, the consumption of resources (metals, plastics, chemicals) will increase and with it the amounts of e-waste generated.This session will explore e-waste landscape and trends, introduce a new industry-led initiative that responds to it and hear directly from its members as to the actions they’re taking to achieve a more circular electronics industry.
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
Circular Photovoltaics & Solar Recycling
1:30 pm - 2:45 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

To be announced
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council (GEC)

1:55 pm (CET)

End-of-life management of PV panels and trends in PV module recycling technologies – averting the crisis
Andreas Wade
Global Sustainability Director
First Solar

2:20 pm (CET)

PHOTORAMA – A circular approach towards a sustainable photovoltaic industry
Claire Agraffeil
Project Manager
CEA/INES (Institut National de l'Energie Solaire)
The IRENA projections have already announced 60-78 million tons of Photovoltaic (PV) wastes worldwide and about 10 million tons in Europe. Considering the context of the climate change issue, solar energy has become the best candidate to lead the energy transition and move towards the carbon neutral paradigm. A huge deployment is expected in the coming decades and this will consequently increase the amount of PV waste while the current recycling solutions are mostly inefficient in terms of materials recovery. In order to challenge downcylcing practises, the PHOTORAMA project funded under the European Union’s H2020 programme is currently implementing a comprehensive circular model focused on developing innovative recycling technologies.

2:45 pm (CET)

Re-use of PV Panels: Challenges or Opportunities?
Jan Clyncke
Managing Director
PV Cycle
The European WEEE Directive 2012/19/EU states general rules to distinguish used electrical and electronic equipment versus waste electrical and electronic equipment by the fact of the existence of an invoice/contract, evidence of functionally by testing, and adequate packaging. The largest obstacle for applying the existing definition is the unclear requirement of the functional state of PV Panels concerning performance and safety. In summary, according to our assessment, PV Panels are by design long-lasting products. Under the condition of existing well-regulated and controlled schemes for their technical inspection, repair and final treatment the re-use is feasible, clearly and socially desirable. The economic viability of the sector is currently achieved in low-income countries as clearly proven by the fact that most worldwide and European actors export towards these regions. PV Panel re-use in developed countries is currently only viable for niche applications and its uptake will depend if/how CO2 footprint of electronic products will be integrated in the product cost. Overall, the unclear legislation, the lack of control of the WEEE directive, and the nearly complete lack of similar legislations outside the EU raise serious environmental and safety concerns about the re-use of PV modules. At the dawn of the first decommissioning wave of PV systems, followed by an expected rapid rise of the volumes of re-usable PV Panels, we ask for a careful assessment of the sector and its adequate regulations in concertation with the relevant global actors
Taking electronics circular
3:40 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

3:40 pm (CET)

Towards a digital circular society
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum

4:05 pm (CET)

The handling of old electronics in private households and concepts for improvement
Alexander Suessmilch
Managing Shareholder
CIRECON
In German households 32 million tons of electrical waste is stored, resulted in an inquiry of the Bitkom 2018. The reason for that we found out with our survey. We asked over 500 end consumers what happens to their unused electronic equipment at home and why their readiness to dispose of old units is so low – this is shown by the low recycling rates of 45% in Germany. Our survey result show a clear trend into higher willingness to recycle if the right take-back concepts are presented by manufacturers, dealers and other companies obliged to collect and take back e-waste units.

4:30 pm (CET)

Panel Discusion: To be announced
Yuri Saito
Community Engagement Specialist - Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation
World Economic Forum

Day2: December 1, 2021

Eco-principles in consumer electronics: redesign, repurpose or refurbish
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Turning E-Waste to r(E)-Source
Efrat Friedland
Founder/Materials Strategist
materialscout
If we are here, today, discussing E-Waste, this means there is still a lot to be done. Let's start by treating this "waste" differently. Not only be inventing and developing additional recycling methods, but by understanding it is not waste, but a valuable resource. We all have to make this switch in perception; as producers of these materials, as processors of parts made of these materials, as brands designing products made of these parts and as consumers using these products. Not sure how to make this switch? materialscout will be happy to show you some case studies of products that already exhibit a shift to circularity and equip you with food for thought and tools to implement.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Systemic change through multi-stakeholder collaboration
Marcel Jacobs
Executive Director
ARCTIC - Alliance for Responsible Circular & Transparent procurement of ICT
ARCTIC - Alliance for Responsible Circular and Transparent procurement of ICT brings together joint statement of demand. Three product categories have been selected - mobile (smart) phones, laptops and data centers Four stakeholder groups collaborate on three key priorities 3 key deliverables Buyers speaking with a single voice: Harmonize and standardize demand, Secure buying organisations commitment (public & private sector) through consolidated criteria. Awareness raising: Increase Knowledge at both market and demand (buyers) side (topics Circular Economy, Business models, Circular/Sustainable procurement). System change: stakeholder collaboration striving for a breakthrough in innovation covering overall system, products/solutions, infra structure processes, procurement, market. The process is managed through 6 workstreams that: Raise awareness & increase knowledge Define harmonized criteria & align standards Simplify & standardize (procurement) processes Clarify impact of products, services & solutions Identify supporting policy tools Drive system innovation For more information please check www.arctic-alliance.com which explains and outlines the relevance of a global multi-stakeholder initiative
 

9:50 am (CET)

The future role of EPR schemes, the Italian case study – initiatives and projects
Luca Campadello
Project & Research Manager
ERION
In the priority sectors for circular economy, e-waste and waste batteries are facing challenging times. How to reach the targets for the return rates, how to support OEMs in circular economy initiatives with innovative solutions and how to face complexity in recycling and preparation for reuse. To give an overview on good practices, European projects (NONTOX for plastics, BELT for energy labelling, Circular Housing for new business models) and innovative initiatives (EXCEED for professional WEEE) will be showcased.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

Do e-textiles require specific legislation to avoid harmful waste?
Jessica Saunders
Programme Director
London College of Fashion
E-textiles are a rapidly expanding body of materials, with extensive prototyping and market testing being carried out globally with potential fashion, military and medical applications. This is leading to novel combinations of nano materials, electrical components and fibres with a challenging waste profile. A small number of researchers such as Kohler 2011,2013 [2,3] and Veske, P. et al. (2019) have identified the need for regulation in this area and have highlighted the potential environmental impact of e-textiles. These emerging textiles are partially covered by a myriad of directives and legislature from three very separate disciplines which means there is potential for e-textiles to find their way into landfill due to their position on the edges of WEEE and REACH legislation in the EU and UK. E-textile developers are calling for action to clarify the position of e-textiles in legislature and to define related standards. Furthermore as a budding product area there is time to engender environmentally aware design for disassembly practice into new products. How this is brought about and what it looks like is an important part of e-textiles journey to the mass market, requiring cross disciplinary discourse with stakeholder and policy maker engagement.
 

11:10 am (CET)

Fast Tracks: a requirement for a Circular Economy of Electronic Wastes
Chris Slijkhuis
Board Member
European Electronics Recyclers Association (EERA)
The current way how waste shipments are organized should undergo a serious re-think, as it impedes proper recycling rather than supporting this. The presentation will dig into the procedures for shipping waste across borders, it will share the experience of how a new classification of plastic waste was introduced and how Switzerland and Ghana have proposed to name all E-Waste as hazardous waste. E-Waste is an important raw material for valuable secondary raw materials, of executed properly and therefore compliant E-Waste recyclers need to get easy access to these raw materials.
 

11:35 am (CET)

To be announced
Pieter Imhof
Sr.Business Developer Circular Economy & Environment
TNO
 

12:00 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: To be announced
Adolfo Villafiorita
Project Lead
REPLAY project & Shair.Tech
This panel will go into the opportunities that responsible e-waste management in developing countries have to offer. The challenge of finding the right financing mechanisms is a big one, but there is light at the end of the tunnel. Experts look into this challenge and what innovative ideas are out there to tackle it.
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
Exploring routes to re-use for discarded EEE: re-use practices and principles moving toward a circular economy
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

When the Circular Economy Meets Environmental Justice
Jim Puckett
Executive Director & Founder
Basel Action Network (BAN)

1:55 pm (CET)

The psychology of reused e-waste
Cris Stephenson
CEO
Environcom
As the largest UK white goods re-use business. Envirocom has access to some interesting data and conclusions on the why, how and where re-use appliances are sold. E-waste re-use needs to mature and expand out of the cottage business it is and become a mainstay of our retail landscape and more importantly of our psychological purchasing DNA.

2:20 pm (CET)

Reverse engineering embedded systems to reduce e-waste
Maurits Fennis
Founder/CEO
Unbinare
The presentation will discuss reverse engineering embedded devices within the context of sustainability. We will cover the tools we have developed internally at the lab and how we use these tools to repurpose discarded devices. I will shortly present the hardware tools that are used internally at Unbinare and how these can be used to reduce e-waste.
Networking Session -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 

3:15 pm (CET)

To be announced
Jan Hoogstrate
Executive Director
Free ICT Europe Foundation

3:40 pm (CET)

To be announced
Anthony Levy
CEO
Cistor

4:05 pm (CET)

The development of new ways to recycle electronics using bacteria
Professor Sebastien Farnaud
Professor, Faculty Research Centre for Sport, Exercise & Life Sciences
Coventry University

4:30 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion: Reducing e-waste: practical experience from the front line
Anthony Levy
CEO
Cistor
A candid view of the challenges facing technology manufacturers and business consumers in reducing e-waste, including some myth-busting, repeatable real-life success stories, and how technology can be more sustainable.

Electric Vehicles & Battery Recycling

Day1: November 30, 2021

Keynote sessions
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

To be announced
Sébastien Léger
Partner at McKinsey & Company leading Energy and Sustainability Practices
McKinsey
 

9:25 am (CET)

Future Mobility is powered by Sustainable Raw Materials
Dr Roland Gauss
Senior Advisor for Raw Materials Substitution and Recycling
EIT RawMaterials
New forms of sustainable mobility are enabled by innovation in Advanced Materials, for instance, in batteries, magnets for e-drives, lightweight materials. They are made of Raw Materials that significantly determine the environmental footprint of the entire product. Emerging energy and mobility technologies create a strong demand for raw materials and advanced materials. For some critical materials, this demand will dramatically exceed current production in the next 10 to 15 years. Limited access might negatively impact the mobility transition, thus reducing the competitiveness of the European raw materials industry.
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:20 am (CET)

End-of-life management of lithium-ion batteries
Hans Eric Melin
Managing Director
Circular Energy Storage
Circular Energy Storage covers the lithium-ion battery market from a life-cycle perspective. The company collects and analyzes information on batteries and applications placed on the market, how they are used, re-used and recycled. It tracks the volumes, follows the players, prices and the research. And then they turn that into actionable data and analysis. Hans-Eric will exclusively present the main findings from Circular Energy Storage's new research, 'The lithium-ion life cycle report 2020'. 
 

10:45 am (CET)

The new EU Battery Regulation and how it affects battery use and recycling
Johannes Roessner
Global Focus Segment Manager NEV
TÜV SÜD
The new EU Battery Regulation significantly expands the requirements on what batteries need to fulfill to be allowed onto the EU market. These requirements are not only targeting the production and quality of the products, but also extend towards requirements on second life use as well as on the recycling process. The speech will provide an overview of this regulation and give insights about the requirements that need to be fulfilled when the battery is leaving its first life.
 

11:10 am (CET)

A roadmap for the future of Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling
Gavin Harper
Faraday Institution Research Fellow
University of Birmingham
This presentation will look at present and anticipated developments in the recycling and reuse of Lithium Ion Batteries, evaluating the current state of the art, near term developments and anticipating the future technologies that will play a role in Lithium Ion Batteries. The presentation is based on work that is being undertaken at the University of Birmingham on the Met4Tech Project, and the Faraday Institution’s ReLiB project. A roadmap for Lithium Ion Battery Recycling is currently being edited by Prof. Emma Kendrick and the presenter for the journal JPhys Energy.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: To be announced
Nancy Gillis
CEO
Green Electronics Council (GEC)
Panellists to be announced
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 am (CET)
 
Battery waste, recycling and sustainability in the electric vehicle transition
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

Regulatory challenges associated with the switch to electric cars
Prof Aleksandra Cavoski
Professor of Environmental Law, College Director of Global Engagement
University of Birmingham
Prof Robert Lee
Director of the Centre for Legal Education and Research
University of Birmingham
Dr Jyoti Ahuja
Research Fellow
University of Birmingham
The guided switch to electric vehicles is a major policy intervention in the transition to net zero carbon and an increasing number of jurisdictions are setting dates for the phasing out of internal combustion engine models. Making this announcement is perhaps the easiest step on the net zero journey because what follows are a series of shared challenges that demonstrate the difficulties of such a switch without proper regard to circular economy considerations. The paper examines a series of legal and regulatory hurdles in ensuring access to security of supply of technology metals crucial to this energy transition. In Europe, there is a significant reliance on imports of technology metals given the volume of batteries planned and not helped by regulatory, fiscal and technical complexities associated with the reuse and recycling of lithium-ion batteries (LiBs). This is coupled with unresolved ownership questions over lithium-ion batteries which affect their fate once they reach the end of their life in the vehicle. The revised EU Batteries Regulation through policy devices such as minimum content of recycled metals in LiBs begins to address these issues. However, we will argue that greater attention needs to be given to waste hierarchy questions applying to these batteries as well as to a much more robust approach to questions of eco-design and that true circular economy approaches must be adopted if the transition to electric vehicles is to provide a sustainable solution.

1:55 pm (CET)

The challenges for development of intelligent recycling equipment for EOL EV batteries recycling
Sun Zhi
Co-Founder
CycleWell
The development of electric vehicles (EVs) has been accelerated given the growing concerns regarding climate change and the energy crisis, which has led to the explosion of end of life (EoL) EV batteries. Recycling of the EoL EV batteries has become a vital part of circular economy and received extensive attention from governments around the world. Although many technologies have been developed for recycling valuable component from batteries, less attention has been devoted to the development of equipment that used for recovery batteries. In this report, the challenges for development of intelligent recycling equipment that must be faced include safety, environmental and economic issues will be introduced.

2:20 pm (CET)

Accelerating Electric Mobility with Circular Economy
Tilmann Vahle
Associate/Lead
SYSTEMIQ/Circular Economy Initiative Deutschland
Presenting Background and key results from SYSTEMIQ's work on how to make batteries a major force for sustainable mobility and energy systems via Circular Economy principles. Building on our Analyses and Industry /Sciences engagement for the WEF Global Battery Alliance http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_A_Vision_for_a_Sustainable_Battery_Value_Chain_in_2030_Report.pdf and with the Circular Economy Initiative Deutschland group on circularity in traction batteries https://www.circular-economy-initiative.de/s/TB_Gesamtbericht-EN.pdf, including positions regarding the upcoming EU circularity policies such as Battery Regulation, ELV directive, and more.
Networking Session -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 

3:15 pm (CET)

Meeting Europe’s Lithium Converter Demand for E-Car and Energy Storage Needs
Dirk Harbecke
CEO
Rock Tech Lithium

3:40 pm (CET)

Demand and supply of Lithium-Ion battery materials: recycled materials as additional feedstock
Wolfgang Bernhart
Senior Partner
Roland Berger
Demand and supply of Lithium-Ion battery materials: recycled materials as additional feedstock - Development of the battery market and technologies used: a 3 TWh in 2030 - Expected demand in critical battery materials and resulting supply chain risks: challenges for Lithium and Nickel - Current status of battery material recycling (EU vs China, production vs EoL): today dominated by China driven by production scrap - Legislative requirements for recycling (focus EU): higher recycling efficiency and recovery rates required - Role of 2nd life (refurbishment and stationary): dedicated ESS cells could be more attractive economically - Factors influencing recycling profitability: battery access, reverse logistics, recycling process costs, material prices - Opportunities and challenges for industry players

4:05 pm (CET)

To be announced
Georg Doninger
Head of Research & Development
LINETECHNOLOGY

Day2: December 1, 2021

Technologies leading the charge on recycling used electric vehicle batteries
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

SOLVENT EXTRACTION IN BATTERY RECYCLING – CRITERIA FOR DILUENT SELECTION
Daniel Bien
Global Technology Advisor Fluids
ExxonMobil
Solvent extraction plays an important role in the recovery of “critical materials” like Cobalt and Nickel and more recently also Lithium in the recycling process of batteries. The diluent impacts not only the performance but also certain aspects of sustainability of the process. The paper will present criteria and industry examples of how to select the most suitable diluent.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Innovative Separation Technology for the Recycling of Lithium Ion Batteries
Athan Fox
Chief Technology & Innovation Officer
Ever Resource Ltd
In March 2021, Ever Resource Ltd in partnership with the University of Birmingham, UK, won a grant of approximately £950,000 GBP to develop an innovative separation technology for the recycling of lithium-ion batteries. Our process, which is physical / mechanical in nature, is capable of separating with greater than 99% efficiency the anode-arisings and cathode-arisings in shredded lithium-ion batteries. By separating these main component streams physically - mechanically, the downstream recycling becomes cleaner, cheaper and more environmentally sensible. The technology is compatible with all recycling innovations and incumbent technology - including pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, cathode-to-cathode recovery, and electrolysis. In Willenhall, UK, we are currently setting up a pilot-scale operation shredding 500 kg of lithium-ion batteries per hour. Our 2-year project with the University of Birmingham will develop further the separation technology with a view to integrating the system in Willenhall and providing a commercial offering to the UK market from Q4 2021.
 

9:50 am (CET)

Recycling and Repurposing of EV Lithium-Ion Batteries
Christian Winkler
Managing Director
TES-AMM (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Our focus will be e-waste recycling and repurposing, especially for EV lithium Ion batteries. We classify used batteries into two categories. One is end-of-life batteries which can no long be used or already damaged. We will do recycling for this type of batteries. The other is second life batteries with remaining capacity which can be reused and repurposed as renewable energy after sorting and processing. The content of the presentation will include sections below: -Our TES-AMM E-waste Recycling introduction and processes -Certification and requirements for battery transportation and deployment -Electronic Vehicle Market analysis -Reused Second life Energy Storage System Introduction -PV+ Smart Grid/ Micro grid system applications -Case study Demonstrations -Q&A Discussion
 
Networking Session -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

Developments in the processing of LIBS
Christian Kuehn
Sales Director
BHS-Sonthofen GmbH
As far as the market is growing, does grow the insights in the processing of LIBS. BHS gone show its latest developments.
 

11:10 am (CET)

Battery Recycling on the Verge of Commercialization
Jean-Christophe Lambert
Business Development Manager
Lithion Recycling
Heading towards 2022, Lithion will have completed its piloting phase and will be right on the verge of its transition to its commercial phase. This new phase will result in the construction of its first commercial plant in Quebec as well as Lithion's deployment in North America and Europe through licensing agreements. We wish to share with attendees the final results of our piloting as well as the completed requirements for the scale-up of our battery recycling technology. Our presentation will also demonstrate how licensing a battery recycling technology can help achieve our energy transition goals and tackle this problem in time. Finally, Lithion will share its own status in terms of commercial development but as well its insights on the battery recycling sector in North America and the current challenges that this industry faces. We wish to give attendees a good overview of the current North American policies and market dynamics around battery recycling.
 

11:35 am (CET)

The Role of Recycling in the Supply Chain of Critical Battery Materials
Kunal Phalpher
Chief Commercial Officer
Li-Cycle
This presentation will explore the urgent need for creating a sustainable and local critical battery materials supply chain, while addressing the economic and sustainability challenges of lithium-ion battery recycling and how Li-Cycle’s Spoke & Hub Technologies are able to help overcome some of these industry challenges and close the loop for critical battery materials throughout the world.
 

12:00 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion: Discharging electric vehicle battery packs at the end of life (when, how and why?)
Athan Fox
Chief Technology & Innovation Officer
Ever Resource Ltd
Sam Haig
Battery Recycling Business Manager
R S Bruce Metals Recovery
At the end of life, electric vehicle battery packs are hazardous for a number of reasons, including the electric charge which they possess. The discharging of electric vehicle battery packs enables safer and low-cost transportation, as well as processing at the end of life. However, there is no harmonised or standard solution for the discharging challenge. With multiple battery chemistries, multiple cell designs, multiple battery pack designs and different ways in which modules are assembled into packs, the challenge of what to dismantle – and when – and how to discharge is considered. Stabilisation solutions including cryogenics, thermal treatment, discharge in aqueous solutions and smart electronic systems will be debated.
 
Networking Session -
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
More batteries, less waste: transitioning to a circular battery metals value chain
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

To be announced
Robert Colbourn
Manager - Benchmark Membership
Benchmark Mineral Intelligence

1:55 pm (CET)

The advanced characterization of battery materials recycling intermediates
Mark Bedford
Business Development Director
Johnson Matthey Plc
The recycling of end-of-life lithium-ion batteries is an essential step in reducing the carbon footprint of electric vehicles. Mechanical separation techniques used at the start of the recycling process commonly produce an intermediate material known as black mass. This is a heterogeneous mixture of graphite, lithium electrolytes, organic binders and cathode metals. To facilitate further processing and to determine an accurate composition from which the economic value of the black mass can be assessed, representative sampling, analysis and characterization are essential next steps. Drawing on its extensive experience and know-how in precious metals refining, Johnson Matthey uses a variety of advanced physical and instrumental techniques to produce a comprehensive and accurate analysis of black mass. This presentation highlights the challenges and complexities of this crucial task.

2:20 pm (CET)

Megawatt scale re-use of BEV-batteries better than recycling?
Jürgen Kölch
Referent Strategy and Innovation
EVA Fahrzeugtechnik (Member of FEV Group)
The environmental benefits of an electric vehicle face repeated criticism. Along with the use of CO2-intensive, coal-based electricity for vehicle operation, the ecological rucksack of the battery is the primary focus. When the battery is reused at the end of the vehicle’s service life, the environmental benefits far exceed those of just regular recycling. The presentation will show two already realized battery plants on a megawatt scale and report the experience in planning and construction. Both systems are used for grid control and can support a smart grid in the future.
Networking Session -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 

3:15 pm (CET)

Bioeconomy meets e-mobility: How microbes enable carbon neutral battery recycling
Dr Esther Gabor
Programme Manager Green & Urban Mining
BRAIN
Dr Gina Kuippers
Research Scientist
BRAIN
People usually think of “bioeconomy” as cows, corn and biogas, but bioeconomy has so much more on offer: At BRAIN Biotech we have developed calorie-free plant-based sweeteners, enzymes that support wound management and a technology to leach metals from e-waste using microbes. Recently we asked ourselves the question “How can bioeconomy help to make battery recycling more sustainable?”. At the centre of this question is the efficient recovery of lithium and cobalt, two elements that raw material experts regard as critical due to their scarcity, cumbersome production and risk of supply. They are located in the cathode material of lithium ion batteries and, after discharging and dismantling, they can be recovered in a mixture called “black mass” together with other metal compounds. Today, metals are recovered from black mass in energy-intensive smelting plants that release climate-damaging gases and fail to recover most of the lithium. Alternatively, hydrometallurgical approaches use aggressive chemicals and produce acidic waste piles that are costly to dispose of. We believe these strategies belong to the past and envisage a truly green process for the recycling of (EV) batteries. Our vision is that microorganisms take over lithium and cobalt extraction and lead to a fully environmentally friendly and sustainable battery recycling process.

3:40 pm (CET)

To be announced
Zarko Meseldzija
Director & CTO
American Manganese Inc

4:05 pm (CET)

What is the most cost- and CO2-effective set-up for collection & recycling of EV-batteries?
Jodok Reinhardt
Co-founder
Librec
What are the current and future interests and challenges for car manufacturers regarding a most cost- and CO2-efficient collection and recycling of EV-batteries? Current and future volumes of manufacturing scrap and end-of-life batteries, today’s recycling capacity in Europe, control of circular flow of raw materials, high transportation cost, EU-wide take-back obligation and required recovery rates are the major conditions to be addressed. We present research results, maximum economic distance for collection, best-available recycling technology and details behind the unbeatable cost advantage of the “Spoke-and-Hub” service model.

5:00 pm (CET)

Panel Discussion: Recycling strategies for End-of-Life Li-ion Batteries from Heavy Electric Vehicles - Pyro VS hydrometallurgy in battery recycling
Hans Eric Melin
Managing Director
Circular Energy Storage
Emma Nehrenheim
Chief Environmental Officer
Northvolt
Pascal Leroy
Director General
WEEE Forum

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